2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159901
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect Of Music On Postoperative Pain and Anxiety: A Pilot Study
Abstract:
The Effect Of Music On Postoperative Pain and Anxiety: A Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Hogan, Kimberly, MS
P.I. Institution Name:Northwest Community Hospital
Contact Address:800 W Central Rd, Arlington Heights, IL, 60005, USA
Contact Telephone:847-394-1407
Co-Authors:K. Hogan, , Northwest Community Hospital, Arlington Heights, IL;
PURPOSE/AIMS: To measure the effect of music on pain and anxiety following outpatient knee and shoulder arthroscopies. SIGNIFICANCE: Pain control is a major concern for patients and post anesthesia care nurses (PACU) nurses alike. Narcotic analgesics may cause nausea, hypotension and sedation, thus prolonging PACU stays. Anxiety also complicates pain control. The effect of music has been studied in patients following abdominal, ENT and cardiac surgery, but not in the outpatient orthopedic population. DESIGN: A quasi-experimental study measuring the effect of music on pain levels, anxiety, and PACU length of stay. METHODS: Study participants consisted of a convenience sample (N=45, 24 treatment, 21 control of subjects undergoing elective outpatient knee or shoulder arthroscopies. The principal investigator used the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) to measure pain levels and the abbreviated State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) to assess anxiety. Chart reviews yielded information regarding PACU Phase 1 length of stay (LOS) as well as narcotic consumption, which was then converted to morphine mg/kg equivalents. ANALYSIS: Statistical analysis performed using SPSS included an ANCOVA test to control for the effect of anxiety, narcotic usage, and PACU pain level on admission to PACU Phase 1 on the post-NRS score. Independent T tests measured the difference in mean post NRS scores, PACU LOS, STAI scores, as well as the pre-post NRS scores. FINDINGS: Music had no effect on postoperative anxiety levels, NRS scores and PACU LOS, though a trend toward decreasing pain scores was noted. CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS: Study findings do not confirm previous research showing that music listening decreases postoperative pain and anxiety. Limitations include small sample size, quasi-experimental study design, and lack of control for anesthetic technique and surgical procedure. The STAI may be an inappropriate tool for use to in the immediate postoperative period, as two statements on the STAI could be misinterpreted as "physical" feeling states, and not emotional states. IMPLICATIONS: Music, though it should not be used as a first line treatment for pain control, is indicated as a comfort measure. Further research is indicated in the outpatient orthopedic population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect Of Music On Postoperative Pain and Anxiety: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159901-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect Of Music On Postoperative Pain and Anxiety: A Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hogan, Kimberly, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northwest Community Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">800 W Central Rd, Arlington Heights, IL, 60005, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">847-394-1407</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">K_Hogan2003@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Hogan, , Northwest Community Hospital, Arlington Heights, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">PURPOSE/AIMS: To measure the effect of music on pain and anxiety following outpatient knee and shoulder arthroscopies. SIGNIFICANCE: Pain control is a major concern for patients and post anesthesia care nurses (PACU) nurses alike. Narcotic analgesics may cause nausea, hypotension and sedation, thus prolonging PACU stays. Anxiety also complicates pain control. The effect of music has been studied in patients following abdominal, ENT and cardiac surgery, but not in the outpatient orthopedic population. DESIGN: A quasi-experimental study measuring the effect of music on pain levels, anxiety, and PACU length of stay. METHODS: Study participants consisted of a convenience sample (N=45, 24 treatment, 21 control of subjects undergoing elective outpatient knee or shoulder arthroscopies. The principal investigator used the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) to measure pain levels and the abbreviated State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) to assess anxiety. Chart reviews yielded information regarding PACU Phase 1 length of stay (LOS) as well as narcotic consumption, which was then converted to morphine mg/kg equivalents. ANALYSIS: Statistical analysis performed using SPSS included an ANCOVA test to control for the effect of anxiety, narcotic usage, and PACU pain level on admission to PACU Phase 1 on the post-NRS score. Independent T tests measured the difference in mean post NRS scores, PACU LOS, STAI scores, as well as the pre-post NRS scores. FINDINGS: Music had no effect on postoperative anxiety levels, NRS scores and PACU LOS, though a trend toward decreasing pain scores was noted. CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS: Study findings do not confirm previous research showing that music listening decreases postoperative pain and anxiety. Limitations include small sample size, quasi-experimental study design, and lack of control for anesthetic technique and surgical procedure. The STAI may be an inappropriate tool for use to in the immediate postoperative period, as two statements on the STAI could be misinterpreted as &quot;physical&quot; feeling states, and not emotional states. IMPLICATIONS: Music, though it should not be used as a first line treatment for pain control, is indicated as a comfort measure. Further research is indicated in the outpatient orthopedic population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:26:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:26:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.