2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159902
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing Emotional Intelligence in Nursing Students
Abstract:
Developing Emotional Intelligence in Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Holston, Ezra C, PhD, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois State University
Title:Mennonite College of Nursing
Contact Address:227 Edwards Hall, Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61790, USA
Contact Telephone:309-438-2404
Co-Authors:E. Holston, M. Kim, S. Kossman, J. Mollenhauer, Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal, IL;
The nursing shortage is estimated to exceed 25% by 2010. The escalating rate of nursing students dropping out of their pre-licensure nursing programs will increase this shortage unless measures are implemented to arrest the growing dropout rate. Emotional intelligence (EI) may be one such measure although no studies have longitudinally investigated EI's development and progression in nursing students. The purpose of this longitudinal, correlational study with a repeated measure design is to characterize EI's development and progression as observed in students aged 18 and older in a pre-licensure nursing program from baseline (program entrance) through 2 7-month follow-up evaluations (program completion), within a 2-year period. The conceptual framework will be the concept of EI, which is defined by five linking theories: general mood, interpersonal functioning, intrapersonal functioning, stress management, and adaptability. Specific aims are to characterize EI's components, describe the change in EI's progression over time, identify any patterns of change in EI's progression, and describe the longitudinal relationship among EI's components by gender and age. A convenience sample of 50 first-semester first-year students in a pre-licensure nursing program will be recruited from a 4-year suburban university. Bar-On's Emotional Inventory will be used to measure EI, general mood, interpersonal skills, intrapersonal skills, stress management, and adaptability. Age, gender, and grade point average will also be measured. Data will be grouped by gender and analyzed with descriptive statistics, correlational analysis, and analysis of variance repeated measures for within-between interactions. Understanding the development of EI in nursing students may assist in reversing the plummeting retention rate. Emotional intelligence will enhance nursing students' ability to cope with the stress and emotional challenges associated with a nursing curriculum. Thus, they will have the ability to complete the pre-licensure nursing program, while assisting in the reduction of the nursing shortage.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping Emotional Intelligence in Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159902-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Developing Emotional Intelligence in Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Holston, Ezra C, PhD, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Mennonite College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">227 Edwards Hall, Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61790, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309-438-2404</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eholst@ilstu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">E. Holston, M. Kim, S. Kossman, J. Mollenhauer, Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The nursing shortage is estimated to exceed 25% by 2010. The escalating rate of nursing students dropping out of their pre-licensure nursing programs will increase this shortage unless measures are implemented to arrest the growing dropout rate. Emotional intelligence (EI) may be one such measure although no studies have longitudinally investigated EI's development and progression in nursing students. The purpose of this longitudinal, correlational study with a repeated measure design is to characterize EI's development and progression as observed in students aged 18 and older in a pre-licensure nursing program from baseline (program entrance) through 2 7-month follow-up evaluations (program completion), within a 2-year period. The conceptual framework will be the concept of EI, which is defined by five linking theories: general mood, interpersonal functioning, intrapersonal functioning, stress management, and adaptability. Specific aims are to characterize EI's components, describe the change in EI's progression over time, identify any patterns of change in EI's progression, and describe the longitudinal relationship among EI's components by gender and age. A convenience sample of 50 first-semester first-year students in a pre-licensure nursing program will be recruited from a 4-year suburban university. Bar-On's Emotional Inventory will be used to measure EI, general mood, interpersonal skills, intrapersonal skills, stress management, and adaptability. Age, gender, and grade point average will also be measured. Data will be grouped by gender and analyzed with descriptive statistics, correlational analysis, and analysis of variance repeated measures for within-between interactions. Understanding the development of EI in nursing students may assist in reversing the plummeting retention rate. Emotional intelligence will enhance nursing students' ability to cope with the stress and emotional challenges associated with a nursing curriculum. Thus, they will have the ability to complete the pre-licensure nursing program, while assisting in the reduction of the nursing shortage.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:26:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:26:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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