Maternal Distress During Mealtimes and Toddlers' Regulatory Skills Predict Toddler Feeding Dysregulation in Low-Income Mother-Toddler Dyads.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159903
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal Distress During Mealtimes and Toddlers' Regulatory Skills Predict Toddler Feeding Dysregulation in Low-Income Mother-Toddler Dyads.
Abstract:
Maternal Distress During Mealtimes and Toddlers' Regulatory Skills Predict Toddler Feeding Dysregulation in Low-Income Mother-Toddler Dyads.
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Horodynski, Mildred, Phd, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Contact Address:B515G West Fee Hall, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Contact Telephone:517-355-8360
Co-Authors:M.A. Horodynski, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; T. Martoccio, H. Brophy-Herb, Family and Child Ecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; R.F. Schiffman, College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, M
Purpose/Conceptual Framework: Low-income mothers more often engage in feeding practices that interrupt the development of feeding self-regulation during toddlerhood and contribute to feeding problems. The purposes of this study were to examine maternal (emotion style, distress at mealtimes, allowance for toddler self-feeding regulation) and toddler (regulatory skills outside of mealtime) characteristics that predict feeding dysregulation in toddlers, guided by the Theory of Dependent Care. Subjects/Method: Data were collected as part of a larger curriculum development and evaluation project in 3 Early Head Start programs with 160 mother-toddler dyads (toddlers were at least 12 months old at enrollment) and consisted of oral structured interviews and parent-child interactions, which were videotaped. Key measures included Mealtime Behavior (self-report questionnaire and direct observation), Maternal Emotional Styles Questionnaire, Infant-Toddler Social-Emotional Assessment, and a toddler delay of gratification task (direct assessment). Data were collected at two time points, seven months apart. Data were analyzed using hierarchical multiple regression, with toddlers' eating dysregulation at time 2 as the dependent variable. Results: Mothers' mean age was 27 years; toddlers, 26 months. Most mothers were single, 64%, white, 86%, not employed, 67%, and had a high school education, 46%. Maternal distress during mealtimes, toddlers' regulatory skills outside of mealtime, and feeding dysregulation at time 1 significantly predicted mothers' report of toddler feeding dysregulation at time 2. While mothers' allowance for toddler feeding self-regulation during mealtime and positive emotion style were not significant predictors, the overall model accounted for 51% of the variance, F(9,150) = 18.99, p < .001, as compared to 40% without the inclusion of these measures. Conclusions: Families must deal with the developmental process of the toddler's self-regulation over feeding. Feeding is central to toddlers' emerging independence and autonomy. Nurses need to work with mothers in improving maternal feeding behaviors for appropriate toddler feeding self-regulation to occur.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal Distress During Mealtimes and Toddlers' Regulatory Skills Predict Toddler Feeding Dysregulation in Low-Income Mother-Toddler Dyads.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159903-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maternal Distress During Mealtimes and Toddlers' Regulatory Skills Predict Toddler Feeding Dysregulation in Low-Income Mother-Toddler Dyads.</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Horodynski, Mildred, Phd, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">B515G West Fee Hall, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">517-355-8360</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">millie@msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.A. Horodynski, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; T. Martoccio, H. Brophy-Herb, Family and Child Ecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; R.F. Schiffman, College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, M</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Conceptual Framework: Low-income mothers more often engage in feeding practices that interrupt the development of feeding self-regulation during toddlerhood and contribute to feeding problems. The purposes of this study were to examine maternal (emotion style, distress at mealtimes, allowance for toddler self-feeding regulation) and toddler (regulatory skills outside of mealtime) characteristics that predict feeding dysregulation in toddlers, guided by the Theory of Dependent Care. Subjects/Method: Data were collected as part of a larger curriculum development and evaluation project in 3 Early Head Start programs with 160 mother-toddler dyads (toddlers were at least 12 months old at enrollment) and consisted of oral structured interviews and parent-child interactions, which were videotaped. Key measures included Mealtime Behavior (self-report questionnaire and direct observation), Maternal Emotional Styles Questionnaire, Infant-Toddler Social-Emotional Assessment, and a toddler delay of gratification task (direct assessment). Data were collected at two time points, seven months apart. Data were analyzed using hierarchical multiple regression, with toddlers' eating dysregulation at time 2 as the dependent variable. Results: Mothers' mean age was 27 years; toddlers, 26 months. Most mothers were single, 64%, white, 86%, not employed, 67%, and had a high school education, 46%. Maternal distress during mealtimes, toddlers' regulatory skills outside of mealtime, and feeding dysregulation at time 1 significantly predicted mothers' report of toddler feeding dysregulation at time 2. While mothers' allowance for toddler feeding self-regulation during mealtime and positive emotion style were not significant predictors, the overall model accounted for 51% of the variance, F(9,150) = 18.99, p &lt; .001, as compared to 40% without the inclusion of these measures. Conclusions: Families must deal with the developmental process of the toddler's self-regulation over feeding. Feeding is central to toddlers' emerging independence and autonomy. Nurses need to work with mothers in improving maternal feeding behaviors for appropriate toddler feeding self-regulation to occur.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:26:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:26:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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