2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159905
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of Technology Use to Collect Data from Latino Migrant Farmworkers
Abstract:
Evaluation of Technology Use to Collect Data from Latino Migrant Farmworkers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Kilanowski, Jill, Ph.D., RN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:614-560-1885
Co-Authors:J.F. Kilanowski, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;
Low health literacy may affect people's ability to complete complex forms, share personal information, and understand the expectations of all parties during participation in research studies. The use of interviewers for survey data collection is labor-intensive and costly compared to self-administered methods and may also introduce social desirability bias. The successful use of electronic devices such as PDAs in research data collection has been reported in the literature. This study examines the feasibility of using audio-enhanced personal digital assistants (ADPAs) to collect data from Latino MFWs. A second study tested the use of tablet computers in this same population. This study was Phase 1 of a descriptive exploratory study that involved the collection of data on the social determinants of the MWF family. First, four surveys were installed on the APDA: acculturation, household food security, self-efficacy and demographics. The second study designed a food frequency survey to be highly visual and auditory on a tablet computer. The PRECEDE-PROCEED self-management model guided the main research study. The model provides structure for the assessment of health needs and guides the design of interventions that will best match unique populations. MFWs (n = 60) were recruited at residential camps. Participants responded positively to APDAs, remained focused, and engaged; none declined its use. Time completing the 58-question surveys in English or Spanish averaged 19 minutes. Increased length of survey time (LST) was related to no previous computer experience, less acculturation, Spanish speaker, and low education. The greatest influence on LST was education level. The tablet study will be completed fall 2010. Participants were parents of a summer program for migrant children. The APDAs facilitated ease of data collection in the community setting and decreased test burden on the participants. The auditory component of the PDA enabled those who would have had difficulty in reading and responding to questionnaires to become active participants in the research project. To assist in the reduction of health disparities, cultural and literacy appropriate data collection methods need to be developed from the expanding technology available.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of Technology Use to Collect Data from Latino Migrant Farmworkersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159905-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of Technology Use to Collect Data from Latino Migrant Farmworkers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kilanowski, Jill, Ph.D., RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">614-560-1885</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jfk19@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.F. Kilanowski, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Low health literacy may affect people's ability to complete complex forms, share personal information, and understand the expectations of all parties during participation in research studies. The use of interviewers for survey data collection is labor-intensive and costly compared to self-administered methods and may also introduce social desirability bias. The successful use of electronic devices such as PDAs in research data collection has been reported in the literature. This study examines the feasibility of using audio-enhanced personal digital assistants (ADPAs) to collect data from Latino MFWs. A second study tested the use of tablet computers in this same population. This study was Phase 1 of a descriptive exploratory study that involved the collection of data on the social determinants of the MWF family. First, four surveys were installed on the APDA: acculturation, household food security, self-efficacy and demographics. The second study designed a food frequency survey to be highly visual and auditory on a tablet computer. The PRECEDE-PROCEED self-management model guided the main research study. The model provides structure for the assessment of health needs and guides the design of interventions that will best match unique populations. MFWs (n = 60) were recruited at residential camps. Participants responded positively to APDAs, remained focused, and engaged; none declined its use. Time completing the 58-question surveys in English or Spanish averaged 19 minutes. Increased length of survey time (LST) was related to no previous computer experience, less acculturation, Spanish speaker, and low education. The greatest influence on LST was education level. The tablet study will be completed fall 2010. Participants were parents of a summer program for migrant children. The APDAs facilitated ease of data collection in the community setting and decreased test burden on the participants. The auditory component of the PDA enabled those who would have had difficulty in reading and responding to questionnaires to become active participants in the research project. To assist in the reduction of health disparities, cultural and literacy appropriate data collection methods need to be developed from the expanding technology available.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:26:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:26:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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