Stroke Caregivers: Pressing Problems Reported During the First Months of Caregiving

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159906
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stroke Caregivers: Pressing Problems Reported During the First Months of Caregiving
Abstract:
Stroke Caregivers: Pressing Problems Reported During the First Months of Caregiving
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:King, Rosemarie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Northwestern University Feinberg Medical School
Title:Phys Med & REhabillitation
Contact Address:Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, 345 E. Superior St., Ste. 1406, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA
Contact Telephone:312-908-8038
Co-Authors:R.B. King, , Northwestern University, Feinberg Medical School, Chicago, IL; C. Rourke Ainsworth , R.J. Hartke, M. Ronen, P. Semik, , Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL;
INTRODUCTION. Caregivers report high levels of distress during the first months following a family member's stroke. The purposes of this mixed methods study were to assess: a) the stress levels, coping effectiveness, and frequency of problems during the first four months as a caregiver; and b) the relationship between stress and caregiver variables. A stress and coping model guided the study. METHODS. Participants were randomized to the treatment arm of a stress management study (N = 58). They reported their most pressing problems, and rated problem stress and coping effectiveness on a five point scale during 10 treatment sessions conducted over four months. Caregiver descriptive and well-being data were collected prior to discharge to home. RESULTS. Fifteen problem categories were identified using content analysis. Three problem-related themes emerged: stroke survivor functioning (SF), interpersonal disruptions (IPD), and sustaining the self and family (SS&F). SS&F problems were most frequent (202) followed by 182 SF and 94 IPD problems. Although less frequent, IPD problems were rated as more stressful than other problem types. IPD was moderate-very stressful compared with SS&F and SF, which were moderately and fairly stressful, respectively. Coping effectiveness was lowest for IPD (a little effective) compared with SS&F and SF, which were fairly effective. With the exception of non-compliance, which was more prevalent during the first month, problem frequency was stable over time. A component of emotional distress, either anxiety or depression, was related to each theme. Anxiety(r = .37), female sex (r = .38), and negative problem orientation (r = .30) were related positively to SF stress. Positive life changes (r = -.32) and care-giving preparation (r = -.35) were related negatively to SF stress. Anxiety (r = .41) and White race (r = .38) were related positively to IPD, and depression was related positively to SS&F (r = .29). All p values were under .05. CONCLUSION. Assessment of the type of problems that caregivers face during early care-giving and counseling on stress management and problem-solving may improve caregiver well-being.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStroke Caregivers: Pressing Problems Reported During the First Months of Caregivingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159906-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stroke Caregivers: Pressing Problems Reported During the First Months of Caregiving</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">King, Rosemarie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northwestern University Feinberg Medical School</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Phys Med &amp; REhabillitation</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, 345 E. Superior St., Ste. 1406, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-908-8038</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rbking@northwestern.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R.B. King, , Northwestern University, Feinberg Medical School, Chicago, IL; C. Rourke Ainsworth , R.J. Hartke, M. Ronen, P. Semik, , Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">INTRODUCTION. Caregivers report high levels of distress during the first months following a family member's stroke. The purposes of this mixed methods study were to assess: a) the stress levels, coping effectiveness, and frequency of problems during the first four months as a caregiver; and b) the relationship between stress and caregiver variables. A stress and coping model guided the study. METHODS. Participants were randomized to the treatment arm of a stress management study (N = 58). They reported their most pressing problems, and rated problem stress and coping effectiveness on a five point scale during 10 treatment sessions conducted over four months. Caregiver descriptive and well-being data were collected prior to discharge to home. RESULTS. Fifteen problem categories were identified using content analysis. Three problem-related themes emerged: stroke survivor functioning (SF), interpersonal disruptions (IPD), and sustaining the self and family (SS&amp;F). SS&amp;F problems were most frequent (202) followed by 182 SF and 94 IPD problems. Although less frequent, IPD problems were rated as more stressful than other problem types. IPD was moderate-very stressful compared with SS&amp;F and SF, which were moderately and fairly stressful, respectively. Coping effectiveness was lowest for IPD (a little effective) compared with SS&amp;F and SF, which were fairly effective. With the exception of non-compliance, which was more prevalent during the first month, problem frequency was stable over time. A component of emotional distress, either anxiety or depression, was related to each theme. Anxiety(r = .37), female sex (r = .38), and negative problem orientation (r = .30) were related positively to SF stress. Positive life changes (r = -.32) and care-giving preparation (r = -.35) were related negatively to SF stress. Anxiety (r = .41) and White race (r = .38) were related positively to IPD, and depression was related positively to SS&amp;F (r = .29). All p values were under .05. CONCLUSION. Assessment of the type of problems that caregivers face during early care-giving and counseling on stress management and problem-solving may improve caregiver well-being.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:26:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:26:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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