An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Molecular Assays and Sampling Methods for the Detection of Oropharyngeal HPV

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159907
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Molecular Assays and Sampling Methods for the Detection of Oropharyngeal HPV
Abstract:
An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Molecular Assays and Sampling Methods for the Detection of Oropharyngeal HPV
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Kostas-Polston, Elizabeth, RN; PHD
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, MO, 65775, USA
Contact Telephone:417.293.8605
Co-Authors:E.A. Kostas-Polston, School of Nursing, Saint Louis University, St.Louis, MO;
Background: HPV is the most common STI in the U.S. and is a principal source of the estimated 5,600 cancers that occur yearly. While the overall incidence of head and neck cancers is steadily decreasing, the incidence in OP cancer is increasing. Of clinical significance is HPV genome 16, quickly becoming one of the leading causes of OP cancer in women with a history of cervical cancer, and accounting for up to 95% of all HPV-positive, OP tumors in men. These trends lead clinicians to be concerned about the relationship between individuals with HPV infection and their sexual partners. Screening for persistent, HPV-positive infection is critical in view of the strong association between HPV infection and OP cancer. Conceptual Model: Hanahan & Weinerg's (2000) Acquired Capabilities of Cancer model will be used. Methods: Individuals who are 18 years or older, speak English, and have an oral lesion may participate. This project, a prospective, pilot study, will explore two analytic as well as two sampling methods to screen for OP-HPV infection. Each will be tested in various combinations and compared with biopsy data regarding the presence or absence of HPV infection. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values will be determined. Subject characteristics will be assessed using frequencies for categorical level parameters and measures of central tendency. Results generated from this pilot study will be used to perform a power analysis. Significance: Establishing the best laboratory assay and sampling method will provide information that could eventually lead to the identification of an accurate, non-invasive test to screen for the early detection of HPV-related, OP cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Investigation of the Effectiveness of Molecular Assays and Sampling Methods for the Detection of Oropharyngeal HPVen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159907-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Molecular Assays and Sampling Methods for the Detection of Oropharyngeal HPV</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kostas-Polston, Elizabeth, RN; PHD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, MO, 65775, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">417.293.8605</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">epolston@slu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">E.A. Kostas-Polston, School of Nursing, Saint Louis University, St.Louis, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: HPV is the most common STI in the U.S. and is a principal source of the estimated 5,600 cancers that occur yearly. While the overall incidence of head and neck cancers is steadily decreasing, the incidence in OP cancer is increasing. Of clinical significance is HPV genome 16, quickly becoming one of the leading causes of OP cancer in women with a history of cervical cancer, and accounting for up to 95% of all HPV-positive, OP tumors in men. These trends lead clinicians to be concerned about the relationship between individuals with HPV infection and their sexual partners. Screening for persistent, HPV-positive infection is critical in view of the strong association between HPV infection and OP cancer. Conceptual Model: Hanahan &amp; Weinerg's (2000) Acquired Capabilities of Cancer model will be used. Methods: Individuals who are 18 years or older, speak English, and have an oral lesion may participate. This project, a prospective, pilot study, will explore two analytic as well as two sampling methods to screen for OP-HPV infection. Each will be tested in various combinations and compared with biopsy data regarding the presence or absence of HPV infection. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values will be determined. Subject characteristics will be assessed using frequencies for categorical level parameters and measures of central tendency. Results generated from this pilot study will be used to perform a power analysis. Significance: Establishing the best laboratory assay and sampling method will provide information that could eventually lead to the identification of an accurate, non-invasive test to screen for the early detection of HPV-related, OP cancer.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:26:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:26:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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