Supporting Patients' Health Promotion Decisions: An Integrative Literature Review of Lymphedema in Exercise Performance by Breast Cancer Survivors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159908
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Supporting Patients' Health Promotion Decisions: An Integrative Literature Review of Lymphedema in Exercise Performance by Breast Cancer Survivors
Abstract:
Supporting Patients' Health Promotion Decisions: An Integrative Literature Review of Lymphedema in Exercise Performance by Breast Cancer Survivors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Krassa, Teresa, PhD, RN, CNE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Biobehavioral Health Science
Contact Address:University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, 408 South Goodwin Ave (MC-076), Urbana, IL, 61801, USA
Contact Telephone:(217) 333-9584
Co-Authors:T.J. Krassa, Biobehavioral Health Science, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, Urbana, IL;
Treatment innovations mean breast cancer is a manageable chronic illness. In 2009, about 192,370 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer (Jemal et al., 2009). Nurses must influence breast cancer survivors (BCS) to engage in health promotion activities such as exercise. There are concerns teaching about exercise regarding the risk of patients developing lymphedema. "As many as 20 to 40 out of every 100 women treated for breast cancer will experience lymphedema in their lifetime" (Armer, 2004, p. 207). Lymphedema affects BCS' quality of life, functional ability, body image, and infection risk. Nurses should support BCS' exercise intentions by providing EBP information. The purpose of this study was to conduct an integrative literature review of the most recent research literature on lymphedema in exercise performance by breast cancer survivors. Research questions: What does the current research from 1992 to 2009 indicate regarding lymphedema in exercise performance by women with breast cancer? What are the implications of the research literature about lymphedema in exercise performance by breast cancer survivors for oncology nurses? Design: qualitative, integrative literature review (ILR) guided by Orem's (2001) Model. Twenty studies meeting the inclusion criteria from the past seventeen years were identified on CINAHL, PubMed, SUMSearch, Academic Search Premier, and Cochrane Systematic Reviews databases. Using Ganong's (1987) method, a collection tool provided analysis categories. Rules were established to compare study methods and conclusions using descriptive analysis. Results supported teaching BCS about physical and psychological benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise. There is insufficient evidence to support a standard guideline about the safety of upper extremity exercise in terms of lymphedema risk or exacerbation. Lymphedema definitions and measurement techniques, the frequency, duration, and intensity composition of exercise regimens, and compression sleeve use varied across studies. Safe weight lifting amounts unspecified. While trends are promising, further research is needed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSupporting Patients' Health Promotion Decisions: An Integrative Literature Review of Lymphedema in Exercise Performance by Breast Cancer Survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159908-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Supporting Patients' Health Promotion Decisions: An Integrative Literature Review of Lymphedema in Exercise Performance by Breast Cancer Survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Krassa, Teresa, PhD, RN, CNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Biobehavioral Health Science</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, 408 South Goodwin Ave (MC-076), Urbana, IL, 61801, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(217) 333-9584</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tjkrassa@illinois.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">T.J. Krassa, Biobehavioral Health Science, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, Urbana, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Treatment innovations mean breast cancer is a manageable chronic illness. In 2009, about 192,370 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer (Jemal et al., 2009). Nurses must influence breast cancer survivors (BCS) to engage in health promotion activities such as exercise. There are concerns teaching about exercise regarding the risk of patients developing lymphedema. &quot;As many as 20 to 40 out of every 100 women treated for breast cancer will experience lymphedema in their lifetime&quot; (Armer, 2004, p. 207). Lymphedema affects BCS' quality of life, functional ability, body image, and infection risk. Nurses should support BCS' exercise intentions by providing EBP information. The purpose of this study was to conduct an integrative literature review of the most recent research literature on lymphedema in exercise performance by breast cancer survivors. Research questions: What does the current research from 1992 to 2009 indicate regarding lymphedema in exercise performance by women with breast cancer? What are the implications of the research literature about lymphedema in exercise performance by breast cancer survivors for oncology nurses? Design: qualitative, integrative literature review (ILR) guided by Orem's (2001) Model. Twenty studies meeting the inclusion criteria from the past seventeen years were identified on CINAHL, PubMed, SUMSearch, Academic Search Premier, and Cochrane Systematic Reviews databases. Using Ganong's (1987) method, a collection tool provided analysis categories. Rules were established to compare study methods and conclusions using descriptive analysis. Results supported teaching BCS about physical and psychological benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise. There is insufficient evidence to support a standard guideline about the safety of upper extremity exercise in terms of lymphedema risk or exacerbation. Lymphedema definitions and measurement techniques, the frequency, duration, and intensity composition of exercise regimens, and compression sleeve use varied across studies. Safe weight lifting amounts unspecified. While trends are promising, further research is needed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:26:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:26:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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