2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159914
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Health Literacy and Patient Trust on Glycemic Control
Abstract:
The Impact of Health Literacy and Patient Trust on Glycemic Control
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Mancuso, Josephine, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Zablocki VA Medical Center
Title:Primary Care
Contact Address:11210 West Gilbert Ave., Unit B, Wauwatosa, WI, 53226, USA
Contact Telephone:414-384-2000 x47212
Co-Authors:J.M. Mancuso, Primary Care Clinic, Zablocki VA Medical Center, Milwaukee, WI;
Diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by high levels of blood glucose. Glycemic control, measured by HbA1c, is critical to preventing diabetes complications, decreasing medical expenditures, and improving quality of life. This study examined health literacy and patient trust as predictors of glycemic control. Related factors of demographics, socioeconomic status, diabetes knowledge, self-care activities, and depression were also considered. Constructed from theory synthesis, the conceptual framework postulates that patient trust and health literacy are associated with HbA1c. Socioeconomic status and demographics influence health literacy and patient trust subsequently shaping diabetes knowledge. Diabetes knowledge is related to performance of self-care activities, which in turn, affects diabetes complications, specifically depression, thereby impacting HbA1c. Implementing a cross-sectional, predictive design, a convenience sample of 102 uninsured patients with diabetes was recruited from two urban primary care clinics. Standard multiple regression was calculated to predict the impact of health literacy, patient trust, self-care activities, diabetes knowledge, and depression on HbA1c. Correlations, with a Bon Ferroni p<0.01, were analyzed among socioeconomic status, demographics, health literacy, patient trust, diabetes knowledge, self-care activities, depression, and HbA1c. The regression model was significant with patient trust and depression accounting for 28.5% of the variance in HbA1c. There was a significant positive correlation between socioeconomic status and health literacy (rho=.35), between diabetes knowledge and health literacy (rho=.30), and between depression and HbA1c (r=.34). There was a significant negative correlation between patient trust and HbA1c (rho=-.43). Results support promotion of the patient/nurse/provider relationship and depression screening among those with diabetes. Future research is needed to advance the framework and determine what factors may act in concert with, mediate, or override health literacy. Addressing other critical elements with health literacy may increase one's understanding of effective strategies for addressing poor diabetes outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Health Literacy and Patient Trust on Glycemic Controlen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159914-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Impact of Health Literacy and Patient Trust on Glycemic Control</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mancuso, Josephine, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Zablocki VA Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Primary Care</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">11210 West Gilbert Ave., Unit B, Wauwatosa, WI, 53226, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414-384-2000 x47212</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmurphy1@wi.rr.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.M. Mancuso, Primary Care Clinic, Zablocki VA Medical Center, Milwaukee, WI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by high levels of blood glucose. Glycemic control, measured by HbA1c, is critical to preventing diabetes complications, decreasing medical expenditures, and improving quality of life. This study examined health literacy and patient trust as predictors of glycemic control. Related factors of demographics, socioeconomic status, diabetes knowledge, self-care activities, and depression were also considered. Constructed from theory synthesis, the conceptual framework postulates that patient trust and health literacy are associated with HbA1c. Socioeconomic status and demographics influence health literacy and patient trust subsequently shaping diabetes knowledge. Diabetes knowledge is related to performance of self-care activities, which in turn, affects diabetes complications, specifically depression, thereby impacting HbA1c. Implementing a cross-sectional, predictive design, a convenience sample of 102 uninsured patients with diabetes was recruited from two urban primary care clinics. Standard multiple regression was calculated to predict the impact of health literacy, patient trust, self-care activities, diabetes knowledge, and depression on HbA1c. Correlations, with a Bon Ferroni p&lt;0.01, were analyzed among socioeconomic status, demographics, health literacy, patient trust, diabetes knowledge, self-care activities, depression, and HbA1c. The regression model was significant with patient trust and depression accounting for 28.5% of the variance in HbA1c. There was a significant positive correlation between socioeconomic status and health literacy (rho=.35), between diabetes knowledge and health literacy (rho=.30), and between depression and HbA1c (r=.34). There was a significant negative correlation between patient trust and HbA1c (rho=-.43). Results support promotion of the patient/nurse/provider relationship and depression screening among those with diabetes. Future research is needed to advance the framework and determine what factors may act in concert with, mediate, or override health literacy. Addressing other critical elements with health literacy may increase one's understanding of effective strategies for addressing poor diabetes outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:27:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:27:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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