Gastrostomy Versus Nasally or Orally Placed Feeding Tubes to Reduce Aspiration Risk

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159916
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gastrostomy Versus Nasally or Orally Placed Feeding Tubes to Reduce Aspiration Risk
Abstract:
Gastrostomy Versus Nasally or Orally Placed Feeding Tubes to Reduce Aspiration Risk
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Metheny, Norma, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:Adult Health
Contact Address:3525 Caroline, St Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Contact Telephone:314-977-8941
Co-Authors:N.A. Metheny, Adult Health, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO;
Purpose: To describe the degree of aspiration associated with type of tube insertion (gastrostomy versus nasally or orally placed tubes) in a population of critically ill, tube-fed patients. Background: Some clinicians postulate that gastrostomy tubes are less likely to be associated with aspiration because the tube does not transgress the gastroesophageal sphincter; others disagree. Research findings are mixed. Methods: A sample 188 critically ill, tube-fed patients with gastric feedings was followed prospectively over a period of 3 days; 21 had gastrostomy tubes and the remaining 167 had either nasally or orally placed tubes. Tracheal secretions were assayed for pepsin, a proxy for the aspiration of gastric contents. The percentage of pepsin-positive tracheal secretions was calculated for each patient. The two groups (gastrostomy vs other) were compared for aspiration, using the 2-sample Mann Whitney Test. Results: Patients in the gastrostomy group had 44(SD24)% aspiration while those in the nasally/orally placed group had 35(SD24)% aspiration, p = .07. Conclusions: Placement of a gastrostomy tube does not lessen aspiration. Although there are valid reasons for placing gastrostomy tubes, reducing risk for aspiration is not one of them.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGastrostomy Versus Nasally or Orally Placed Feeding Tubes to Reduce Aspiration Risken_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159916-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gastrostomy Versus Nasally or Orally Placed Feeding Tubes to Reduce Aspiration Risk</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Metheny, Norma, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Adult Health</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3525 Caroline, St Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314-977-8941</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">methenna@slu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N.A. Metheny, Adult Health, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To describe the degree of aspiration associated with type of tube insertion (gastrostomy versus nasally or orally placed tubes) in a population of critically ill, tube-fed patients. Background: Some clinicians postulate that gastrostomy tubes are less likely to be associated with aspiration because the tube does not transgress the gastroesophageal sphincter; others disagree. Research findings are mixed. Methods: A sample 188 critically ill, tube-fed patients with gastric feedings was followed prospectively over a period of 3 days; 21 had gastrostomy tubes and the remaining 167 had either nasally or orally placed tubes. Tracheal secretions were assayed for pepsin, a proxy for the aspiration of gastric contents. The percentage of pepsin-positive tracheal secretions was calculated for each patient. The two groups (gastrostomy vs other) were compared for aspiration, using the 2-sample Mann Whitney Test. Results: Patients in the gastrostomy group had 44(SD24)% aspiration while those in the nasally/orally placed group had 35(SD24)% aspiration, p = .07. Conclusions: Placement of a gastrostomy tube does not lessen aspiration. Although there are valid reasons for placing gastrostomy tubes, reducing risk for aspiration is not one of them.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:27:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:27:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.