Psychometric Testing of a Self-Efficacy for Care Partnership Scale and a Family Care Needs Scale for Parents of Children with Epilepsy and Intellectual Disabilities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159917
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychometric Testing of a Self-Efficacy for Care Partnership Scale and a Family Care Needs Scale for Parents of Children with Epilepsy and Intellectual Disabilities
Abstract:
Psychometric Testing of a Self-Efficacy for Care Partnership Scale and a Family Care Needs Scale for Parents of Children with Epilepsy and Intellectual Disabilities
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Miller, Wendy
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Contact Address:1311 N Street, Bedford, IN, 47421, USA
Contact Telephone:812-797-4646
Co-Authors:W.R. Miller, J. Buelow, School of Nursing, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN;
Background: In the United States, over 300,000 children under age 15 have epilepsy. Intellectual disabilities (IDs) (IQ<75) often accompany an epilepsy diagnosis?31% to 43% of children with epilepsy have IDs. As well, 15% of all children with IDs also have epilepsy. Parents of children with both epilepsy and IDs experience more stress than parents of children with epilepsy alone. Despite the high number of ID children with epilepsy, the problem of heightened parental psychological stress remains understudied. It is imperative that this issue be investigated given that parents' reactions to epilepsy are related to their children's psychological and social adjustment. For this reason, interventions designed to improve family environment should be considered. We hypothesize that family stress might be related to unmet care needs. An intervention designed to give families the resources to cope with demands related to care needs might strengthen families and indirectly improve long-term child behavior and mental health. One means to help families meet their care needs is through an intervention that would increase their self-efficacy to partner with support systems, including professionals who can help them address their concerns. To study such interventions, a measure of parental self-efficacy for care partnerships is needed. Purpose: To complete psychometric testing of the self-efficacy for care partnership and family care needs scale. Specifically we determined: 1. The internal consistency of the self-efficacy for care partnership scale and the family care needs scale. 2. The convergent validity of the self-efficacy for care needs scale and the family assessment guide. Methods: Parents who agreed to participate in the survey received the instruments along with an addressed and stamped envelope for return. Data Analysis: Chronbach's alpha will be used to establish internal consistency reliability. To establish the convergent validity of the self-efficacy scale, we will compare self-efficacy scores to the Family Empowerment scale. To establish the convergent validity of the Family Assessment Guide, we will correlate scores of the Family Assessment Guide to an existing Family Needs Scale. Results: Pending.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychometric Testing of a Self-Efficacy for Care Partnership Scale and a Family Care Needs Scale for Parents of Children with Epilepsy and Intellectual Disabilitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159917-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychometric Testing of a Self-Efficacy for Care Partnership Scale and a Family Care Needs Scale for Parents of Children with Epilepsy and Intellectual Disabilities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Miller, Wendy</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1311 N Street, Bedford, IN, 47421, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">812-797-4646</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wrtruebl@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">W.R. Miller, J. Buelow, School of Nursing, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: In the United States, over 300,000 children under age 15 have epilepsy. Intellectual disabilities (IDs) (IQ&lt;75) often accompany an epilepsy diagnosis?31% to 43% of children with epilepsy have IDs. As well, 15% of all children with IDs also have epilepsy. Parents of children with both epilepsy and IDs experience more stress than parents of children with epilepsy alone. Despite the high number of ID children with epilepsy, the problem of heightened parental psychological stress remains understudied. It is imperative that this issue be investigated given that parents' reactions to epilepsy are related to their children's psychological and social adjustment. For this reason, interventions designed to improve family environment should be considered. We hypothesize that family stress might be related to unmet care needs. An intervention designed to give families the resources to cope with demands related to care needs might strengthen families and indirectly improve long-term child behavior and mental health. One means to help families meet their care needs is through an intervention that would increase their self-efficacy to partner with support systems, including professionals who can help them address their concerns. To study such interventions, a measure of parental self-efficacy for care partnerships is needed. Purpose: To complete psychometric testing of the self-efficacy for care partnership and family care needs scale. Specifically we determined: 1. The internal consistency of the self-efficacy for care partnership scale and the family care needs scale. 2. The convergent validity of the self-efficacy for care needs scale and the family assessment guide. Methods: Parents who agreed to participate in the survey received the instruments along with an addressed and stamped envelope for return. Data Analysis: Chronbach's alpha will be used to establish internal consistency reliability. To establish the convergent validity of the self-efficacy scale, we will compare self-efficacy scores to the Family Empowerment scale. To establish the convergent validity of the Family Assessment Guide, we will correlate scores of the Family Assessment Guide to an existing Family Needs Scale. Results: Pending.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:27:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:27:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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