2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159920
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Intervention Patterns Associated with Psychosocial and Parenting Outcomes
Abstract:
Intervention Patterns Associated with Psychosocial and Parenting Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Monsen, Karen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:5-140 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55082, USA
Contact Telephone:612-624-0490
Co-Authors:K.A. Monsen, L. Shen, K. Savik, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;
Evidence on home visiting intervention effectiveness is mixed regarding the clients and circumstances that may benefit from home visiting. Home visiting programs are often lengthy, and optimal duration is not known. Thus, it is critical to identify optimal intervention patterns for specific client problems that promote positive psychosocial and parenting outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine intervention patterns for client psychosocial and parenting problems. The framework is the nursing informatics model. Assumptions that underlie the analysis are that intervention tailoring may be moderated by the client problem and by client characteristics. A retrospective cohort of 1,406 home visiting clients who received 76,892 public health nurse interventions was created using the maternal-child caseload from a local Midwest public health agency over a six year period (2000-2005). Intervention patterns were assessed by problem over time. Problems that were addressed with multiple intervention actions, that progressed towards resolution and required only a "watchful eye" (surveillance action only) were considered "stabilized." Outcomes were final status scores for each problem. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics for 10 problems: abuse, antepartum/postpartum, caretaking/parenting, family planning, growth & development, income, mental health, neglect, residence, and substance use. On average, there were 341 clients per problem (range = 88-655), 41% of clients stabilized before discharge (.01% -1.0%), time to discharge was 275 days (231-328), and time to stabilization was 119 days (40-210). The average time to improved status was 376 days (325-410), an average of 114 days longer than time to discharge without improved status. On average, clients reached stabilization 1/3 of the way through the episode of care. There appear to be problem-specific differences in stabilization and setback patterns. For example, for neglect, 88 of 88 clients stabilized, while only 9 of 645 clients stabilized for caretaking/parenting. Survival analysis is in progress. Results will be available by March 2010. Intervention data show diverse patterns by problem and outcome, and results can inform home visiting practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntervention Patterns Associated with Psychosocial and Parenting Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159920-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Intervention Patterns Associated with Psychosocial and Parenting Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Monsen, Karen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5-140 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55082, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612-624-0490</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mons0122@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K.A. Monsen, L. Shen, K. Savik, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Evidence on home visiting intervention effectiveness is mixed regarding the clients and circumstances that may benefit from home visiting. Home visiting programs are often lengthy, and optimal duration is not known. Thus, it is critical to identify optimal intervention patterns for specific client problems that promote positive psychosocial and parenting outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine intervention patterns for client psychosocial and parenting problems. The framework is the nursing informatics model. Assumptions that underlie the analysis are that intervention tailoring may be moderated by the client problem and by client characteristics. A retrospective cohort of 1,406 home visiting clients who received 76,892 public health nurse interventions was created using the maternal-child caseload from a local Midwest public health agency over a six year period (2000-2005). Intervention patterns were assessed by problem over time. Problems that were addressed with multiple intervention actions, that progressed towards resolution and required only a &quot;watchful eye&quot; (surveillance action only) were considered &quot;stabilized.&quot; Outcomes were final status scores for each problem. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics for 10 problems: abuse, antepartum/postpartum, caretaking/parenting, family planning, growth &amp; development, income, mental health, neglect, residence, and substance use. On average, there were 341 clients per problem (range = 88-655), 41% of clients stabilized before discharge (.01% -1.0%), time to discharge was 275 days (231-328), and time to stabilization was 119 days (40-210). The average time to improved status was 376 days (325-410), an average of 114 days longer than time to discharge without improved status. On average, clients reached stabilization 1/3 of the way through the episode of care. There appear to be problem-specific differences in stabilization and setback patterns. For example, for neglect, 88 of 88 clients stabilized, while only 9 of 645 clients stabilized for caretaking/parenting. Survival analysis is in progress. Results will be available by March 2010. Intervention data show diverse patterns by problem and outcome, and results can inform home visiting practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:27:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:27:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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