Academic Success versus Academic Failure among Baccalaureate Nursing Students: A Comparison of Academic Characteristics

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159923
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Academic Success versus Academic Failure among Baccalaureate Nursing Students: A Comparison of Academic Characteristics
Abstract:
Academic Success versus Academic Failure among Baccalaureate Nursing Students: A Comparison of Academic Characteristics
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Newton, Sarah, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Oakland University
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:448 O'Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA
Contact Telephone:(248) 370-4069
Co-Authors:S.E. Newton, G. Moore, D. Norris, School of Nursing, Oakland University, Rochester, MI;
To become a Registered Nurse, baccalaureate (BSN) nursing students must first succeed academically in their respective programs. However, academic failure among BSN students, often resulting in academic dismissal, is an issue affecting BSN programs nationwide with dismissal rates reported as high as 50%. Preliminary work related to academic failure and dismissal among BSN students (Newton, Moore, & Norris, 2009, 2009) indicated that Caucasian nursing students were the students most likely to experience academic dismissal, but that minority nursing students experienced academic dismissal at rates disproportional to their actual numbers. The preliminary data also found that BSN students who experienced academic dismissal were likely to have taken a majority of their pre-requisite credits at a community college, and often had to repeat courses, especially core science courses, to achieve the minimum grade point average required for admission to the BSN program. What the preliminary studies did not reveal was whether BSN students who experienced academic failure and dismissal had academic characteristics that were predictive of the academic difficulties they experienced, and whether their academic characteristics were different from BSN students who were academically successful. The purpose of this study was to compare the academic characteristics of BSN students who experienced academic failure with those who were academically successful. The results indicated that BSN students who experienced academic failure and dismissal had academic characteristics upon admission that distinguished them from BSN students who were successful, and that were predictive of academic failure. Nursing educators need to ensure that policies governing admissions and progression incorporate key findings from the literature to promote academic success and minimize the likelihood of academic failure among baccalaureate nursing students.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAcademic Success versus Academic Failure among Baccalaureate Nursing Students: A Comparison of Academic Characteristicsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159923-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Academic Success versus Academic Failure among Baccalaureate Nursing Students: A Comparison of Academic Characteristics</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Newton, Sarah, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oakland University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">448 O'Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(248) 370-4069</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">newton@oakland.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.E. Newton, G. Moore, D. Norris, School of Nursing, Oakland University, Rochester, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">To become a Registered Nurse, baccalaureate (BSN) nursing students must first succeed academically in their respective programs. However, academic failure among BSN students, often resulting in academic dismissal, is an issue affecting BSN programs nationwide with dismissal rates reported as high as 50%. Preliminary work related to academic failure and dismissal among BSN students (Newton, Moore, &amp; Norris, 2009, 2009) indicated that Caucasian nursing students were the students most likely to experience academic dismissal, but that minority nursing students experienced academic dismissal at rates disproportional to their actual numbers. The preliminary data also found that BSN students who experienced academic dismissal were likely to have taken a majority of their pre-requisite credits at a community college, and often had to repeat courses, especially core science courses, to achieve the minimum grade point average required for admission to the BSN program. What the preliminary studies did not reveal was whether BSN students who experienced academic failure and dismissal had academic characteristics that were predictive of the academic difficulties they experienced, and whether their academic characteristics were different from BSN students who were academically successful. The purpose of this study was to compare the academic characteristics of BSN students who experienced academic failure with those who were academically successful. The results indicated that BSN students who experienced academic failure and dismissal had academic characteristics upon admission that distinguished them from BSN students who were successful, and that were predictive of academic failure. Nursing educators need to ensure that policies governing admissions and progression incorporate key findings from the literature to promote academic success and minimize the likelihood of academic failure among baccalaureate nursing students.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:27:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:27:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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