Perimenopausal Bone Health: Early Detection of Low Bone Density and Theoretical Application to Health Promotion

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159926
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perimenopausal Bone Health: Early Detection of Low Bone Density and Theoretical Application to Health Promotion
Abstract:
Perimenopausal Bone Health: Early Detection of Low Bone Density and Theoretical Application to Health Promotion
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Olson, Ann, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Winona State University
Contact Address:206 Michaelwood Drive, Winona, MN, 55987, USA
Contact Telephone:507-454-8436
Co-Authors:A.F. Olson, Nursing and Health Sciences, Winona State University, Winona, MN;
Background: Promoting bone health is an important women's health focus. Current osteoporosis intervention research focuses primarily on post-menopausal women. Most women are unaware of their osteoporosis risk until after the rapid perimenopausal bone density loss is detected by postmenopausal bone density testing. Understanding women's motivation toward preventive behaviors is needed in bone health promotion research and practice. Purpose: To determine bone health testing effects among perimenopausal women on outcomes of perceptions of, intentions toward, and actual participation in bone health behaviors (calcium and vitamin D intake, physical activity). Methods: A longitudinal repeated measures experimental design, using Theory of Planned Behavior underpinnings, randomly assigned 150 women, ages 35-55, to intervention (n=75, bone health information and testing) or to comparison (n=75, bone health information only). Baseline demographic data were collected; the Prevention Intentions and Behaviors Questionnaires were administered at baseline, 2 weeks, and 2 months after interventions. Results: 149 women completed the study. 32% of the intervention group had low bone density. Repeated measures ANOVA found a significant interaction effect of the intervention over comparison group for Perceptions of adequate calcium intake and vitamin D intake (p < .001); near-significance (p = .068) in affecting women's Intentions toward bone health behaviors; a significant time effect for vitamin D intake, (p < .001); and a near-significant interaction between calcium and group (p = .052), finding that comparison group women continued to consume far more than the recommended calcium intake. Conclusion: Interventions focusing on perimenopausal women should include providing bone health information. However, information alone may not be enough for appropriate bone health behavior. Early detection and intervention of perimenopausal bone loss may support effective bone health behaviors, may reduce osteoporosis morbidity, and improve women's quality of life, thus reducing financial consequences to individuals, families, communities, and the nation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerimenopausal Bone Health: Early Detection of Low Bone Density and Theoretical Application to Health Promotionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159926-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perimenopausal Bone Health: Early Detection of Low Bone Density and Theoretical Application to Health Promotion</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Olson, Ann, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Winona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">206 Michaelwood Drive, Winona, MN, 55987, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">507-454-8436</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aolson@winona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A.F. Olson, Nursing and Health Sciences, Winona State University, Winona, MN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Promoting bone health is an important women's health focus. Current osteoporosis intervention research focuses primarily on post-menopausal women. Most women are unaware of their osteoporosis risk until after the rapid perimenopausal bone density loss is detected by postmenopausal bone density testing. Understanding women's motivation toward preventive behaviors is needed in bone health promotion research and practice. Purpose: To determine bone health testing effects among perimenopausal women on outcomes of perceptions of, intentions toward, and actual participation in bone health behaviors (calcium and vitamin D intake, physical activity). Methods: A longitudinal repeated measures experimental design, using Theory of Planned Behavior underpinnings, randomly assigned 150 women, ages 35-55, to intervention (n=75, bone health information and testing) or to comparison (n=75, bone health information only). Baseline demographic data were collected; the Prevention Intentions and Behaviors Questionnaires were administered at baseline, 2 weeks, and 2 months after interventions. Results: 149 women completed the study. 32% of the intervention group had low bone density. Repeated measures ANOVA found a significant interaction effect of the intervention over comparison group for Perceptions of adequate calcium intake and vitamin D intake (p &lt; .001); near-significance (p = .068) in affecting women's Intentions toward bone health behaviors; a significant time effect for vitamin D intake, (p &lt; .001); and a near-significant interaction between calcium and group (p = .052), finding that comparison group women continued to consume far more than the recommended calcium intake. Conclusion: Interventions focusing on perimenopausal women should include providing bone health information. However, information alone may not be enough for appropriate bone health behavior. Early detection and intervention of perimenopausal bone loss may support effective bone health behaviors, may reduce osteoporosis morbidity, and improve women's quality of life, thus reducing financial consequences to individuals, families, communities, and the nation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:27:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:27:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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