Six Month Outcomes of a Psychoeducational Program for Depression in Women with Diabetes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159928
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Six Month Outcomes of a Psychoeducational Program for Depression in Women with Diabetes
Abstract:
Six Month Outcomes of a Psychoeducational Program for Depression in Women with Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Penckofer, Sue, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Contact Address:2160 S. First Avenue, Bld 105, Room 2840, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA
Contact Telephone:708-216-9303
Co-Authors:S. Penckofer, M. Byrn, J. Ostrom, School of Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL; P. Mumby, School of Medicine , Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL; C. Ferrans, College of Nursing , University of Illinois, Chicago, IL; P. Lustman, School of
Depression significantly impacts quality of life (QoL). Women with diabetes are twice as likely to have depression as men with diabetes. The health-related QoL for persons who have diabetes and depression is significantly lower than for persons who have either depression alone or diabetes alone. The Wilson and Cleary Health-Related Quality of Life (QoL) Framework guided this study to evaluate the six month outcomes of women with type 2 diabetes (n=54) who participated in a randomized trial for depression treatment. The Study of Women's Emotions and Evaluation of a Psychoeducational (SWEEP) Program included an 8 week session followed by 2 booster sessions (6 weeks apart) that focused on learning new coping strategies, changing negative thought patterns, and using effective communication skills for treatment of depression. For women who had depression at baseline (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression, CES-D greater than or equal to 16), by three months, 48% of the treatment group and 24% of the control group had remission of depression (p=.054). By six months, 65% of the treatment group and 13% of the control group were depression-free (CES-D less than 16) (p<.001). For all women who were not depressed at six months, they reported significantly less anxiety (p<.001), anger (p=.001), and stress (p=.001). They also reported better overall QoL (p=.014), health-related QoL (p=.029), psychological/spiritual QoL (p=.011), and greater social support (p=.033). Age (Mean=54.5 years), weight (Mean=229 pounds), years with diabetes (Mean=11), HBA1c (Mean 7.6%), and fasting glucose (Mean=156 mg/dl) were not significantly different between those who were or were not depressed at six months. Results suggest that skills learned in the SWEEP program may assist women in decreasing depressive symptoms and sustaining this outcome. SWEEP may be a promising therapy for nurses to use in caring for women with diabetes who have significant depressive symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSix Month Outcomes of a Psychoeducational Program for Depression in Women with Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159928-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Six Month Outcomes of a Psychoeducational Program for Depression in Women with Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Penckofer, Sue, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2160 S. First Avenue, Bld 105, Room 2840, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">708-216-9303</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">spencko@luc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Penckofer, M. Byrn, J. Ostrom, School of Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL; P. Mumby, School of Medicine , Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL; C. Ferrans, College of Nursing , University of Illinois, Chicago, IL; P. Lustman, School of</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Depression significantly impacts quality of life (QoL). Women with diabetes are twice as likely to have depression as men with diabetes. The health-related QoL for persons who have diabetes and depression is significantly lower than for persons who have either depression alone or diabetes alone. The Wilson and Cleary Health-Related Quality of Life (QoL) Framework guided this study to evaluate the six month outcomes of women with type 2 diabetes (n=54) who participated in a randomized trial for depression treatment. The Study of Women's Emotions and Evaluation of a Psychoeducational (SWEEP) Program included an 8 week session followed by 2 booster sessions (6 weeks apart) that focused on learning new coping strategies, changing negative thought patterns, and using effective communication skills for treatment of depression. For women who had depression at baseline (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression, CES-D greater than or equal to 16), by three months, 48% of the treatment group and 24% of the control group had remission of depression (p=.054). By six months, 65% of the treatment group and 13% of the control group were depression-free (CES-D less than 16) (p&lt;.001). For all women who were not depressed at six months, they reported significantly less anxiety (p&lt;.001), anger (p=.001), and stress (p=.001). They also reported better overall QoL (p=.014), health-related QoL (p=.029), psychological/spiritual QoL (p=.011), and greater social support (p=.033). Age (Mean=54.5 years), weight (Mean=229 pounds), years with diabetes (Mean=11), HBA1c (Mean 7.6%), and fasting glucose (Mean=156 mg/dl) were not significantly different between those who were or were not depressed at six months. Results suggest that skills learned in the SWEEP program may assist women in decreasing depressive symptoms and sustaining this outcome. SWEEP may be a promising therapy for nurses to use in caring for women with diabetes who have significant depressive symptoms.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:27:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:27:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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