2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159929
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Type 2 Diabetes, Depression, and Vitamin D Levels in Women
Abstract:
Type 2 Diabetes, Depression, and Vitamin D Levels in Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Penckofer, Sue, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Contact Address:2160 S. First Avenue, Bld 105, Room 2840, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA
Contact Telephone:708-216-9303
Co-Authors:S. Penckofer, M. Byrn, J. Ostrom, J. Kouba, School of Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL; M. Emanuele, School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL;
Low vitamin D levels are associated with increased cardiac morbidity and mortality. Women with diabetes are at greatest risk for heart disease. Depression is an independent risk factor for heart disease, and is greater in persons with diabetes. This descriptive study examined the association of vitamin D levels, glycemic control, cardiac risk factors, and mood in women with type 2 diabetes. The bio-psycho-social model was used to examine the relationship among the study variables. Measures included (a) biological: serum vitamin D levels, HBA1c, fasting glucose, and diabetes complications and (b) psychological-social: depression, anxiety, and anger. Seventy one women with type 2 diabetes and depressive symptoms were studied. The vitamin D status for the sample was: 41% with deficiency (less than 20 ng/dL), 39% with insufficiency (20 to 29 ng/dL), and 20% with sufficient levels (greater than or equal to 30/ng/dL). Women with deficient vitamin D levels had increased HBA1c (8.2 vs 7.4%) and higher fasting blood glucose (178 vs 165 mg/dL) compared to women with sufficient vitamin D levels. They also had stronger cardiac risk profiles: increased cholesterol (83% vs 67%), more angina (14% vs. 7%), and had undergone more angiograms (21% vs. 14%). Although these differences were clinically significant, they were not statistically significant. Vitamin D deficiency was correlated with depression (r = -.385, p<.05), anxiety (r = -.346, p=.07), and anger (r = -.472, p=.01). Nonwhite women had lower levels of vitamin D (Mean=19.3) compared to white women (Mean=23.6) (p=.08). Results suggest that low vitamin D levels may be associated with worse metabolic control, greater cardiac risk profiles, and more mood disturbance. These findings are provocative in their implications that vitamin D may be important in promoting health through the assessment and management of vitamin D status in persons with diabetes and mood disorders.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleType 2 Diabetes, Depression, and Vitamin D Levels in Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159929-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Type 2 Diabetes, Depression, and Vitamin D Levels in Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Penckofer, Sue, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2160 S. First Avenue, Bld 105, Room 2840, Maywood, IL, 60153, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">708-216-9303</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">spencko@luc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Penckofer, M. Byrn, J. Ostrom, J. Kouba, School of Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL; M. Emanuele, School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Low vitamin D levels are associated with increased cardiac morbidity and mortality. Women with diabetes are at greatest risk for heart disease. Depression is an independent risk factor for heart disease, and is greater in persons with diabetes. This descriptive study examined the association of vitamin D levels, glycemic control, cardiac risk factors, and mood in women with type 2 diabetes. The bio-psycho-social model was used to examine the relationship among the study variables. Measures included (a) biological: serum vitamin D levels, HBA1c, fasting glucose, and diabetes complications and (b) psychological-social: depression, anxiety, and anger. Seventy one women with type 2 diabetes and depressive symptoms were studied. The vitamin D status for the sample was: 41% with deficiency (less than 20 ng/dL), 39% with insufficiency (20 to 29 ng/dL), and 20% with sufficient levels (greater than or equal to 30/ng/dL). Women with deficient vitamin D levels had increased HBA1c (8.2 vs 7.4%) and higher fasting blood glucose (178 vs 165 mg/dL) compared to women with sufficient vitamin D levels. They also had stronger cardiac risk profiles: increased cholesterol (83% vs 67%), more angina (14% vs. 7%), and had undergone more angiograms (21% vs. 14%). Although these differences were clinically significant, they were not statistically significant. Vitamin D deficiency was correlated with depression (r = -.385, p&lt;.05), anxiety (r = -.346, p=.07), and anger (r = -.472, p=.01). Nonwhite women had lower levels of vitamin D (Mean=19.3) compared to white women (Mean=23.6) (p=.08). Results suggest that low vitamin D levels may be associated with worse metabolic control, greater cardiac risk profiles, and more mood disturbance. These findings are provocative in their implications that vitamin D may be important in promoting health through the assessment and management of vitamin D status in persons with diabetes and mood disorders.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:28:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:28:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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