2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159930
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Experiences of Newly Licensed Nurses in their First Eighteen Months of Employment
Abstract:
Experiences of Newly Licensed Nurses in their First Eighteen Months of Employment
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Pinchera, Barbara, DNP
P.I. Institution Name:Curry College
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:3 Carey Circle, Canton, MA, 2021, USA
Contact Telephone:781-828-3275
Co-Authors:B.J. Pinchera, Nursing, Curry College, Milton, MA;
This qualitative study utilized phenomenological inquiry to understand the essence of the experience of the newly licensed nurse. The aim of the study was to provide insight into the initial experience in practice and contribute to information helpful in aiding retention and improving transition. The high attrition rate of newly licensed nurses during their first two years of employment is widely acknowledged (Bowles & Candela, 2005, Halfer, 2007, Lindsey & Kleiner, 2005) and is significant in light of the predicted nursing shortage. A clear understanding of what the initial experiences of employment is like for a newly licensed nurse is not found in nursing literature. The sample was purposive, comprised of and selected from the population of the 2007 graduating class of a four year baccalaureate nursing program. Criteria for inclusion were: completion and passing of the NCLEX and secured employment in nursing for no longer than eighteen months. The sample included five women between the ages of 24 to 28 years who were in practice from 6 months to 17 months. The analysis of data was guided by Colaizzi's methodology. Four themes emerged. They included emotional responses related to assimilation into professional role, transition and application of knowledge, challenges with professional practice development and the impact of relationships on professional practice development. An example of the emotions identified included feeling overwhelmed by the sense of responsibility they had in relation to the extent of their practice. These findings contributed to an understanding of the meaning of the overall experience of a newly licensed nurse. A parallel was noted between the emerging themes and the findings of Duchscher (2009) and her theory of Transition Shock. This theory describes how the newly licensed nurse transitions into a professional practice role. This study provided implications for use in nursing practice, nursing education and future nursing research and offered information regarding the challenges particular to these participants. These results provided helpful insight that may ultimately impact and aid retention of the newly licensed nurse.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExperiences of Newly Licensed Nurses in their First Eighteen Months of Employmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159930-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Experiences of Newly Licensed Nurses in their First Eighteen Months of Employment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pinchera, Barbara, DNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Curry College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3 Carey Circle, Canton, MA, 2021, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">781-828-3275</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bpincher0106@curry.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B.J. Pinchera, Nursing, Curry College, Milton, MA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This qualitative study utilized phenomenological inquiry to understand the essence of the experience of the newly licensed nurse. The aim of the study was to provide insight into the initial experience in practice and contribute to information helpful in aiding retention and improving transition. The high attrition rate of newly licensed nurses during their first two years of employment is widely acknowledged (Bowles &amp; Candela, 2005, Halfer, 2007, Lindsey &amp; Kleiner, 2005) and is significant in light of the predicted nursing shortage. A clear understanding of what the initial experiences of employment is like for a newly licensed nurse is not found in nursing literature. The sample was purposive, comprised of and selected from the population of the 2007 graduating class of a four year baccalaureate nursing program. Criteria for inclusion were: completion and passing of the NCLEX and secured employment in nursing for no longer than eighteen months. The sample included five women between the ages of 24 to 28 years who were in practice from 6 months to 17 months. The analysis of data was guided by Colaizzi's methodology. Four themes emerged. They included emotional responses related to assimilation into professional role, transition and application of knowledge, challenges with professional practice development and the impact of relationships on professional practice development. An example of the emotions identified included feeling overwhelmed by the sense of responsibility they had in relation to the extent of their practice. These findings contributed to an understanding of the meaning of the overall experience of a newly licensed nurse. A parallel was noted between the emerging themes and the findings of Duchscher (2009) and her theory of Transition Shock. This theory describes how the newly licensed nurse transitions into a professional practice role. This study provided implications for use in nursing practice, nursing education and future nursing research and offered information regarding the challenges particular to these participants. These results provided helpful insight that may ultimately impact and aid retention of the newly licensed nurse.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:28:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:28:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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