Clinical Information System Implementation Readiness Activities to Support Nursing in Hospital Settings

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159931
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical Information System Implementation Readiness Activities to Support Nursing in Hospital Settings
Abstract:
Clinical Information System Implementation Readiness Activities to Support Nursing in Hospital Settings
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Piscotty, Ronald, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan & Oakland University
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:55912 Nicholas Drive, Shelby Township, MI, 48316, USA
Contact Telephone:5865880271
Co-Authors:R.J. Piscotty, H. Tzeng, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; G. Keenan, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; R.J. Piscotty, School of Nursing, Oakland University, Rochester, MI;
Purpose: This study examined the clinical information system (CIS) implementation readiness activities adopted by chief nurse executives (CNEs) in hospital settings. CIS is defined as any electronic database and graphical user interface that enables clinicians to streamline, document, and retrieve patient information. The implementation of CISs has a profound impact on nurses and their productivity. Consequently, CNEs must have adequate knowledge to address nurses' concerns related to CIS. Conceptual framework: The CIS Implementation Readiness Model was developed for this study to guide data analysis and interpretation. The model was developed by reviewing previous studies on technology innovation implementation/adoption and revealed that the themes associated with CIS implementation readiness activities included culture, champion support, change preparation, funding, access, usability, training, organizational alignment, communication, decision-making, and planning. Subjects: CNEs of six member hospitals of a national faith-based healthcare organization were interviewed. Hospitals ranged in type and size. The CIS implementation phase of each CNE's hospital varied (pre-implementation, implementing, post-implementation). Methods: Descriptive qualitative design, using interviews. The constant comparative method was used to analyze the CNE interviews to extract readiness activity themes and then compare to literature. Results: The majority of CNE responses were classified into the model thematic areas of: champion support, staff preparation for change, training, organizational alignment, and planning (see Appendix A) with the themes of culture, funding, access, usability, decision-making, and communication having the fewest responses. A new theme not previously identified in the model but clear in the CNE responses is the lack of vendor support. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest key areas that CNEs should consider when determining readiness of nursing staff for successfully implementing a CIS.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical Information System Implementation Readiness Activities to Support Nursing in Hospital Settingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159931-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Clinical Information System Implementation Readiness Activities to Support Nursing in Hospital Settings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Piscotty, Ronald, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan &amp; Oakland University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">55912 Nicholas Drive, Shelby Township, MI, 48316, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">5865880271</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">piscotty@gmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R.J. Piscotty, H. Tzeng, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; G. Keenan, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL; R.J. Piscotty, School of Nursing, Oakland University, Rochester, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study examined the clinical information system (CIS) implementation readiness activities adopted by chief nurse executives (CNEs) in hospital settings. CIS is defined as any electronic database and graphical user interface that enables clinicians to streamline, document, and retrieve patient information. The implementation of CISs has a profound impact on nurses and their productivity. Consequently, CNEs must have adequate knowledge to address nurses' concerns related to CIS. Conceptual framework: The CIS Implementation Readiness Model was developed for this study to guide data analysis and interpretation. The model was developed by reviewing previous studies on technology innovation implementation/adoption and revealed that the themes associated with CIS implementation readiness activities included culture, champion support, change preparation, funding, access, usability, training, organizational alignment, communication, decision-making, and planning. Subjects: CNEs of six member hospitals of a national faith-based healthcare organization were interviewed. Hospitals ranged in type and size. The CIS implementation phase of each CNE's hospital varied (pre-implementation, implementing, post-implementation). Methods: Descriptive qualitative design, using interviews. The constant comparative method was used to analyze the CNE interviews to extract readiness activity themes and then compare to literature. Results: The majority of CNE responses were classified into the model thematic areas of: champion support, staff preparation for change, training, organizational alignment, and planning (see Appendix A) with the themes of culture, funding, access, usability, decision-making, and communication having the fewest responses. A new theme not previously identified in the model but clear in the CNE responses is the lack of vendor support. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest key areas that CNEs should consider when determining readiness of nursing staff for successfully implementing a CIS.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:28:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:28:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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