Feeding Motivations of Parents of an Infant with a Complex Congenital Heart Defect

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159933
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Feeding Motivations of Parents of an Infant with a Complex Congenital Heart Defect
Abstract:
Feeding Motivations of Parents of an Infant with a Complex Congenital Heart Defect
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Pridham, Karen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Madison
Contact Address:2011 Van Hise Ave., Madison, WI, 53726-4054, USA
Contact Telephone:608-238-7536
Co-Authors:K. Pridham, A. McKechnie, R. Brown, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI; T. Harrison, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; M. Krolikowski, K. Mussatto, M. Frommelt, Herma Heart Center, Children's Hospita
Background and Aims: Feeding is an issue for parents of infants with a complex congenital heart defect (CCHD) for many reasons, including delayed initiation of oral feedings, required monitoring of intake and weight gain, and pathophysiology contributing to feeding difficulties. Feeding is central to day-to-day caregiving. Understanding parental feeding motivations (FMs) may enhance family-centered guidance concerning feeding and parenting. We examined the type and evolution of FMs and their articulation with motivations of the IWM of parenting, which encompasses feeding, through the first year. Methods: Parents who participated in a longitudinal, descriptive study were primary caregivers (20 mothers, 3 fathers) of an infant patient of a regional heart center. Parents were interviewed in hospital or home at 1, 4 or 6, and 12 months after the infant's birth. Transcriptions (n = 69) were coded by the research team using directed content analysis for motivations for parenting in general and feeding in particular. Data were organized by family in a matrix of feeding descriptors and categories of IWM and feeding motivations. Graphic display of category proportions permitted comparison of profiles of categories across the 3 assessments. Results: On average, 33 years old, educated several years beyond high school, married with 2 children, and 70% White, parents had infants who required 1 or 2 heart surgeries in their first year. FMs differed in type within time from parent to parent, and, for some parents, varied across time. Content of FMs concerned resolving difficulties, making things easier for self, managing the task, responding sensitively to the infant, and facilitating development of the parent-child relationship. FMs of parents of very young infants often concerned feeding either as a task or relationship issue. As the infant grew older, FMs were more often articulated with IWM motivations concerning family life or personal well being. Conclusions: Knowledge of the feeding motivations that parents have; the infant, family, and personal conditions that shape parents' FMs over time; and FM articulation with IWM motivations for family and personal life is needed to effectively support health-promoting parental feeding practices for infants with a CCHD.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFeeding Motivations of Parents of an Infant with a Complex Congenital Heart Defecten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159933-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Feeding Motivations of Parents of an Infant with a Complex Congenital Heart Defect</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pridham, Karen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2011 Van Hise Ave., Madison, WI, 53726-4054, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608-238-7536</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kpridham@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Pridham, A. McKechnie, R. Brown, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI; T. Harrison, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; M. Krolikowski, K. Mussatto, M. Frommelt, Herma Heart Center, Children's Hospita</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background and Aims: Feeding is an issue for parents of infants with a complex congenital heart defect (CCHD) for many reasons, including delayed initiation of oral feedings, required monitoring of intake and weight gain, and pathophysiology contributing to feeding difficulties. Feeding is central to day-to-day caregiving. Understanding parental feeding motivations (FMs) may enhance family-centered guidance concerning feeding and parenting. We examined the type and evolution of FMs and their articulation with motivations of the IWM of parenting, which encompasses feeding, through the first year. Methods: Parents who participated in a longitudinal, descriptive study were primary caregivers (20 mothers, 3 fathers) of an infant patient of a regional heart center. Parents were interviewed in hospital or home at 1, 4 or 6, and 12 months after the infant's birth. Transcriptions (n = 69) were coded by the research team using directed content analysis for motivations for parenting in general and feeding in particular. Data were organized by family in a matrix of feeding descriptors and categories of IWM and feeding motivations. Graphic display of category proportions permitted comparison of profiles of categories across the 3 assessments. Results: On average, 33 years old, educated several years beyond high school, married with 2 children, and 70% White, parents had infants who required 1 or 2 heart surgeries in their first year. FMs differed in type within time from parent to parent, and, for some parents, varied across time. Content of FMs concerned resolving difficulties, making things easier for self, managing the task, responding sensitively to the infant, and facilitating development of the parent-child relationship. FMs of parents of very young infants often concerned feeding either as a task or relationship issue. As the infant grew older, FMs were more often articulated with IWM motivations concerning family life or personal well being. Conclusions: Knowledge of the feeding motivations that parents have; the infant, family, and personal conditions that shape parents' FMs over time; and FM articulation with IWM motivations for family and personal life is needed to effectively support health-promoting parental feeding practices for infants with a CCHD.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:28:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:28:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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