2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159934
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of a Standardized Assessment Program on NCLEX-RN Pass Rates
Abstract:
Impact of a Standardized Assessment Program on NCLEX-RN Pass Rates
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Ralph, Jody, PhD, RN, MSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Title:Family and Community Nursing
Contact Address:430 Oxford Street, Stop 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58201, USA
Contact Telephone:701-777-4546
Co-Authors:J.L. Ralph, D.L. Roth, L. Paula, College of Nursing, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND; H. Melland, College of Nursing, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT; D.L. Roth, Biostatistics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL;
Purpose: The purpose of this project is to track the NCLEX pass rates prior to and following implementation of a standardized testing program at a college of nursing and to investigate the relationship between students' scores on the NCLEX-readiness exam offered by the company and passing the RN licensure exam on the first attempt. Conceptual Framework: Prevention of harm is an important theoretical concept, both in nursing and in nursing education. Identification and remediation of at-risk students attempts to prevent the negative outcome of NCLEX-RN failure. Incorporation of standardized assessment programs, progression policies, and remediation courses are some of the strategies used by schools of nursing to improve their first-time test-taker pass rates and to identify at-risk students. Verification of the benefits of standardized testing may help to engage student and faculty support. Subjects: Seven semester cohorts of undergraduate BSN students at the college of nursing. Method: Standardized test scores and NCLEX-RN results will be analyzed and reported in aggregate format with a calculation of the average pass rates and logistic regression (receiver operating characteristics curves) comparing the specificity and sensitivity of the predictor exam. Results: Preliminary data analysis suggests 1) a strong relationship between the predictor exam score and the ability to pass the NCLEX on the first attempt and 2) a trend of improved first-attempt NCLEX-RN pass rates following full implementation of standardized testing throughout the curriculum. An additional 50 students have recently graduated and upon inclusion of their NCLEX pass rate statistics, the additional data may allow for confirmation of these observations. Conclusions: The study will provide helpful information for ongoing curricular and policy development and evaluation. The results will be of interest to nurse educators nation-wide as many schools of nursing grapple with the complex decisions regarding incorporation of standardized testing and progression policies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of a Standardized Assessment Program on NCLEX-RN Pass Ratesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159934-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of a Standardized Assessment Program on NCLEX-RN Pass Rates</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ralph, Jody, PhD, RN, MSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Family and Community Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">430 Oxford Street, Stop 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">701-777-4546</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jodyralph@mail.und.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.L. Ralph, D.L. Roth, L. Paula, College of Nursing, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND; H. Melland, College of Nursing, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT; D.L. Roth, Biostatistics, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this project is to track the NCLEX pass rates prior to and following implementation of a standardized testing program at a college of nursing and to investigate the relationship between students' scores on the NCLEX-readiness exam offered by the company and passing the RN licensure exam on the first attempt. Conceptual Framework: Prevention of harm is an important theoretical concept, both in nursing and in nursing education. Identification and remediation of at-risk students attempts to prevent the negative outcome of NCLEX-RN failure. Incorporation of standardized assessment programs, progression policies, and remediation courses are some of the strategies used by schools of nursing to improve their first-time test-taker pass rates and to identify at-risk students. Verification of the benefits of standardized testing may help to engage student and faculty support. Subjects: Seven semester cohorts of undergraduate BSN students at the college of nursing. Method: Standardized test scores and NCLEX-RN results will be analyzed and reported in aggregate format with a calculation of the average pass rates and logistic regression (receiver operating characteristics curves) comparing the specificity and sensitivity of the predictor exam. Results: Preliminary data analysis suggests 1) a strong relationship between the predictor exam score and the ability to pass the NCLEX on the first attempt and 2) a trend of improved first-attempt NCLEX-RN pass rates following full implementation of standardized testing throughout the curriculum. An additional 50 students have recently graduated and upon inclusion of their NCLEX pass rate statistics, the additional data may allow for confirmation of these observations. Conclusions: The study will provide helpful information for ongoing curricular and policy development and evaluation. The results will be of interest to nurse educators nation-wide as many schools of nursing grapple with the complex decisions regarding incorporation of standardized testing and progression policies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:28:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:28:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.