Use of a Tailored Interactive Computer Intervention in Primary Care Changes Health Beliefs about Colorectal Cancer Screening

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159936
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of a Tailored Interactive Computer Intervention in Primary Care Changes Health Beliefs about Colorectal Cancer Screening
Abstract:
Use of a Tailored Interactive Computer Intervention in Primary Care Changes Health Beliefs about Colorectal Cancer Screening
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Rawl, Susan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Contact Address:1111 Middle Drive, NU 340H, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:317-278-2217
Co-Authors:S.M. Rawl, V.L. Champion, C. Krier, K. Russell, School of Nursing, Indiana University , Indianapolis, IN; S. Perkins, Y. Tong, N. Gebregziabher, B. Rhyant, T. Imperiale, D. Willis, School of Medicine , Indiana University , Indianapolis, IN; C.S. Skinner,
Colorectal cancer (CRC) will affect more than 147,000 Americans this year and almost 50,000 will die from this disease. Approximately half of these deaths could be prevented if appropriate colon cancer screening was consistently implemented. Both CRC incidence and mortality rates are highest among African Americans compared to all other racial groups due, in part, to suboptimal CRC screening rates. Interactive health communication has been defined as "computer technology designed to access or transmit tailored health information or receive tailored guidance and support on a health-related issue." In a randomized trial, we are testing the efficacy of a tailored, interactive health communication intervention to increase uptake of CRC screening that is delivered to African American patients while they wait to see their primary care provider. The study used Health Belief Model and Transtheoretical Model constructs as mediators and outcomes as well as to develop tailored messages. Interim analyses using data from 219 patients were conducted to examine changes between baseline health belief scores and scores obtained at 1 week post-intervention. The sample was 59% male and had a mean age of 58 years (sd=6.5). Compared to 112 patients who received a nontailored brochure about CRC screening, 107 patients who used the tailored computer program had lower FOBT barriers scores (p=.053) and higher colonoscopy benefit scores (p=.002) at one week post-intervention. Patients in the computer group were less likely to agree that they: 1) don't have time to do a stool blood test (p=.036), 2) were afraid that colonoscopy would find something wrong (p=.015); and 3) were afraid a colonoscopy would injure their colon (p=.056). The computer group had higher perceived risk of getting CRC in the next 10 years (p=.043) and higher self-efficacy for both FOBT and colonoscopy, reporting greater confidence that they could understand the FOBT instructions (p=.028); drink the special medicine before colonoscopy (p=.008), and go without eating before colonoscopy (p=.045). Tailored interactive health communications are an effective adjunct to the clinical encounter that can change health beliefs about CRC screening, a precursor to screening behavior change.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of a Tailored Interactive Computer Intervention in Primary Care Changes Health Beliefs about Colorectal Cancer Screeningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159936-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Use of a Tailored Interactive Computer Intervention in Primary Care Changes Health Beliefs about Colorectal Cancer Screening</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rawl, Susan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1111 Middle Drive, NU 340H, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317-278-2217</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">srawl@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.M. Rawl, V.L. Champion, C. Krier, K. Russell, School of Nursing, Indiana University , Indianapolis, IN; S. Perkins, Y. Tong, N. Gebregziabher, B. Rhyant, T. Imperiale, D. Willis, School of Medicine , Indiana University , Indianapolis, IN; C.S. Skinner, </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Colorectal cancer (CRC) will affect more than 147,000 Americans this year and almost 50,000 will die from this disease. Approximately half of these deaths could be prevented if appropriate colon cancer screening was consistently implemented. Both CRC incidence and mortality rates are highest among African Americans compared to all other racial groups due, in part, to suboptimal CRC screening rates. Interactive health communication has been defined as &quot;computer technology designed to access or transmit tailored health information or receive tailored guidance and support on a health-related issue.&quot; In a randomized trial, we are testing the efficacy of a tailored, interactive health communication intervention to increase uptake of CRC screening that is delivered to African American patients while they wait to see their primary care provider. The study used Health Belief Model and Transtheoretical Model constructs as mediators and outcomes as well as to develop tailored messages. Interim analyses using data from 219 patients were conducted to examine changes between baseline health belief scores and scores obtained at 1 week post-intervention. The sample was 59% male and had a mean age of 58 years (sd=6.5). Compared to 112 patients who received a nontailored brochure about CRC screening, 107 patients who used the tailored computer program had lower FOBT barriers scores (p=.053) and higher colonoscopy benefit scores (p=.002) at one week post-intervention. Patients in the computer group were less likely to agree that they: 1) don't have time to do a stool blood test (p=.036), 2) were afraid that colonoscopy would find something wrong (p=.015); and 3) were afraid a colonoscopy would injure their colon (p=.056). The computer group had higher perceived risk of getting CRC in the next 10 years (p=.043) and higher self-efficacy for both FOBT and colonoscopy, reporting greater confidence that they could understand the FOBT instructions (p=.028); drink the special medicine before colonoscopy (p=.008), and go without eating before colonoscopy (p=.045). Tailored interactive health communications are an effective adjunct to the clinical encounter that can change health beliefs about CRC screening, a precursor to screening behavior change.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:28:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:28:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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