Testing the Integrated Theory of Health Behavior Change for Postpartum Weight Management

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159940
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Testing the Integrated Theory of Health Behavior Change for Postpartum Weight Management
Abstract:
Testing the Integrated Theory of Health Behavior Change for Postpartum Weight Management
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Ryan, Polly, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
Contact Address:7722 Geralayne Drive, Wauwatosa, WI, 53213, USA
Contact Telephone:414 258-6237
Co-Authors:P. Ryan, , University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; Foredtert Hospital, Milwaukee, WI; M. Weiss, , Marquette University College of Nursing, Milwaukee, WI; N. Traxel, M. Brondino, Center for Addiction and Behavioral Health Research, University of Wisconsin Milwa
New evidence supports the fact that postpartum women retain some of the weight gained during pregnancy in addition to the weight gain observed over time among non-pregnant women. Hence women who have experienced pregnancy and birth of a child face increasing challenges to manage their weight. In this study the Integrated Theory of Health Behavior Change (ITHBC) was tested to explain postpartum weight management. The ITHBC is a midrange theory developed to explain health behavior change and purports that change occurs when interventions focus on enhancing knowledge and beliefs (increasing condition specific knowledge, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy and goal congruence), self-regulation skills and abilities (goal setting, self-monitoring and reflective thinking, decision making, planning and action, and self-evaluation), and social facilitation (social influence and social support). Outcomes are proximal (engagement in self-management behaviors) or distal (health status). Using a longitudinal correlational design, data were collected at baseline post-birth and 4 months via survey. A quota sample of 250 postpartum women using two strata, race/ethnicity and prepregnant weight classification, was enrolled. Exploratory factor analysis and model testing using Mplus software were conducted. The final model tested relationships between self efficacy, outcome expectancy, social support, social influence, and self-regulation. The model explained 25.7% of the variance in post-birth self regulation. The contribution of select concepts to total variance were different for Caucasian and African American women, but not by weight classification. This preliminary work provides a foundation for nurses to develop and test interventions based on the theory. The findings support the importance of ITHBC concepts and relationships to understanding behavior change in the specific situation of postpartum weight management. The different relationships among the concepts in Caucasian and African American women should be considered in planning targeted postpartum weight management interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTesting the Integrated Theory of Health Behavior Change for Postpartum Weight Managementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159940-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Testing the Integrated Theory of Health Behavior Change for Postpartum Weight Management</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ryan, Polly, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7722 Geralayne Drive, Wauwatosa, WI, 53213, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414 258-6237</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ryanpa@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P. Ryan, , University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; Foredtert Hospital, Milwaukee, WI; M. Weiss, , Marquette University College of Nursing, Milwaukee, WI; N. Traxel, M. Brondino, Center for Addiction and Behavioral Health Research, University of Wisconsin Milwa</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">New evidence supports the fact that postpartum women retain some of the weight gained during pregnancy in addition to the weight gain observed over time among non-pregnant women. Hence women who have experienced pregnancy and birth of a child face increasing challenges to manage their weight. In this study the Integrated Theory of Health Behavior Change (ITHBC) was tested to explain postpartum weight management. The ITHBC is a midrange theory developed to explain health behavior change and purports that change occurs when interventions focus on enhancing knowledge and beliefs (increasing condition specific knowledge, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy and goal congruence), self-regulation skills and abilities (goal setting, self-monitoring and reflective thinking, decision making, planning and action, and self-evaluation), and social facilitation (social influence and social support). Outcomes are proximal (engagement in self-management behaviors) or distal (health status). Using a longitudinal correlational design, data were collected at baseline post-birth and 4 months via survey. A quota sample of 250 postpartum women using two strata, race/ethnicity and prepregnant weight classification, was enrolled. Exploratory factor analysis and model testing using Mplus software were conducted. The final model tested relationships between self efficacy, outcome expectancy, social support, social influence, and self-regulation. The model explained 25.7% of the variance in post-birth self regulation. The contribution of select concepts to total variance were different for Caucasian and African American women, but not by weight classification. This preliminary work provides a foundation for nurses to develop and test interventions based on the theory. The findings support the importance of ITHBC concepts and relationships to understanding behavior change in the specific situation of postpartum weight management. The different relationships among the concepts in Caucasian and African American women should be considered in planning targeted postpartum weight management interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:28:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:28:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.