Parental Involvement with Adolescents' Type 1 Diabetes Care Management: Perceptions of Parents and Adolescents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159942
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parental Involvement with Adolescents' Type 1 Diabetes Care Management: Perceptions of Parents and Adolescents
Abstract:
Parental Involvement with Adolescents' Type 1 Diabetes Care Management: Perceptions of Parents and Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Schmidt, Cynthia, Ph.D.
P.I. Institution Name:Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Title:Family Health and Community Health Nursing
Contact Address:7 Goldenrod Lane, Edwardsville, IL, 62025, USA
Contact Telephone:618-650-3921
Co-Authors:C. Schmidt, Family Health and Community Health Nursing, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL;
As children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) reach the adolescent years, their ability to effectively manage diabetes-related demands may decrease the type and degree of parental involvement the adolescent and parent perceive to be appropriate, necessary, or desired. Data show, however, that when parents stay involved in the adolescent's care, there is improved metabolic control. The purpose of this study was to explore the role parents play in diabetes-related care during the adolescent years. Additionally, this study identified specific parental practices that facilitated or impeded adolescents in assuming healthy self-care behaviors. This study involved interviewing separately adolescents with T1D and their parent(s). Guided by the fundamental qualitative description method and the Family Management Style Framework, semi-structured interview guides were used to elicit the thoughts and feelings of parents and adolescents. A purposive sample included teens between the ages of 11 and 19 years who had been diagnosed with T1D for a minimum of two years, along with their parent(s) or legal guardian. To gain a complete understanding of the way families managed the transition process and to identify parental behaviors which were deemed helpful or deleterious, a maximum variation sampling plan was used to include participants from both "effective" managing and "ineffective" managing families. Teens in this study wanted to know that their parents loved them and that parental concerns about their diabetes were secondary. Teens appreciated parents who acknowledged that diabetes requirements were challenging, encouraged open communication about diabetes issues, considered the journey a team effort, and helped the teen frame the challenges in a positive light. Parents reported conflicting emotions about their teen's transition to self care; a common concern was finding a balance between overseeing the child's glucose control and allowing the teen independence with requirements. While parents were eager to be free of the daily responsibilities, they felt it their parental responsibility to ensure that the child maintained reasonable blood glucose levels. Data from this study will help nurses provide more appropriate support to families during this time of transition.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParental Involvement with Adolescents' Type 1 Diabetes Care Management: Perceptions of Parents and Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159942-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parental Involvement with Adolescents' Type 1 Diabetes Care Management: Perceptions of Parents and Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schmidt, Cynthia, Ph.D.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southern Illinois University Edwardsville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Family Health and Community Health Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7 Goldenrod Lane, Edwardsville, IL, 62025, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">618-650-3921</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">caschmi@siue.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Schmidt, Family Health and Community Health Nursing, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) reach the adolescent years, their ability to effectively manage diabetes-related demands may decrease the type and degree of parental involvement the adolescent and parent perceive to be appropriate, necessary, or desired. Data show, however, that when parents stay involved in the adolescent's care, there is improved metabolic control. The purpose of this study was to explore the role parents play in diabetes-related care during the adolescent years. Additionally, this study identified specific parental practices that facilitated or impeded adolescents in assuming healthy self-care behaviors. This study involved interviewing separately adolescents with T1D and their parent(s). Guided by the fundamental qualitative description method and the Family Management Style Framework, semi-structured interview guides were used to elicit the thoughts and feelings of parents and adolescents. A purposive sample included teens between the ages of 11 and 19 years who had been diagnosed with T1D for a minimum of two years, along with their parent(s) or legal guardian. To gain a complete understanding of the way families managed the transition process and to identify parental behaviors which were deemed helpful or deleterious, a maximum variation sampling plan was used to include participants from both &quot;effective&quot; managing and &quot;ineffective&quot; managing families. Teens in this study wanted to know that their parents loved them and that parental concerns about their diabetes were secondary. Teens appreciated parents who acknowledged that diabetes requirements were challenging, encouraged open communication about diabetes issues, considered the journey a team effort, and helped the teen frame the challenges in a positive light. Parents reported conflicting emotions about their teen's transition to self care; a common concern was finding a balance between overseeing the child's glucose control and allowing the teen independence with requirements. While parents were eager to be free of the daily responsibilities, they felt it their parental responsibility to ensure that the child maintained reasonable blood glucose levels. Data from this study will help nurses provide more appropriate support to families during this time of transition.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:28:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:28:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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