Using Community-based Participatory Research Methods to Link Gene Discovery and Translation in a Large Founder Population in Rural Mid-Michigan.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159943
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Community-based Participatory Research Methods to Link Gene Discovery and Translation in a Large Founder Population in Rural Mid-Michigan.
Abstract:
Using Community-based Participatory Research Methods to Link Gene Discovery and Translation in a Large Founder Population in Rural Mid-Michigan.
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Schutte, Debra, PhD RN
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:424-A West Fee, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Contact Telephone:517-432-4310
Co-Authors:D.L. Schutte, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; R.A. Fisher, Pediatrics and Human Development, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; J.D. Bonner, Comparative Medicine and Integrative Biology, Michigan State University
Most common health-related conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and Alzheimer disease are etiologically complex, resulting from the combined effects of many genetic and environmental factors. The contributing genetic factors may be discovered more easily, however, in founder populations due to their relative genetic homogeneity. The purpose of this report is to describe an academic-community research partnership between our institution and descendents of German Catholic immigrants in rural mid-Michigan to study common diseases. Previously, we identified a cluster of individuals with an autosomal recessive form of hearing loss in mid-Michigan and subsequently identified known and novel causative mutations in GJB2. Using public records and personal interviews, we built a genealogical database that included the descendants and ancestors of persons who are deaf from the region. The genealogical database contains 27,726 records. Since this founder population was isolated by language and religion, we hypothesized that they are highly related. To estimate kinship, we used a novel algorithm to cluster individuals into extended pedigrees, and used the methods of Crow and Mange to calculate the degree of kinship based on isonymy. Although the clustering algorithm grouped individuals into 336 pedigrees, 25,899 individuals (93%) were assigned to a single large pedigree. In addition, the coefficient of isonymy indicates that matings from the founder population share a common ancestor 8 generations past. In comparison, a 2001 analysis of isonymy in 247 US cities (including 10 Michigan cities) showed that matings within these cities share a common ancestor 9 to 12 generations past. Given this evidence for a high degree of relatedness and ongoing community interest, we are extending the research partnership beyond hearing loss to examine genetic and environmental factors involved in common health-related conditions, using a community-based participatory approach. The long term goal of this academic-community partnership is to foster gene discovery in a way that promotes wellness and quality of life for community partners and that fosters scholarship and vitality for academic partners.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Community-based Participatory Research Methods to Link Gene Discovery and Translation in a Large Founder Population in Rural Mid-Michigan.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159943-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Community-based Participatory Research Methods to Link Gene Discovery and Translation in a Large Founder Population in Rural Mid-Michigan.</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schutte, Debra, PhD RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">424-A West Fee, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">517-432-4310</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">schutted@msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">D.L. Schutte, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; R.A. Fisher, Pediatrics and Human Development, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI; J.D. Bonner, Comparative Medicine and Integrative Biology, Michigan State University</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Most common health-related conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and Alzheimer disease are etiologically complex, resulting from the combined effects of many genetic and environmental factors. The contributing genetic factors may be discovered more easily, however, in founder populations due to their relative genetic homogeneity. The purpose of this report is to describe an academic-community research partnership between our institution and descendents of German Catholic immigrants in rural mid-Michigan to study common diseases. Previously, we identified a cluster of individuals with an autosomal recessive form of hearing loss in mid-Michigan and subsequently identified known and novel causative mutations in GJB2. Using public records and personal interviews, we built a genealogical database that included the descendants and ancestors of persons who are deaf from the region. The genealogical database contains 27,726 records. Since this founder population was isolated by language and religion, we hypothesized that they are highly related. To estimate kinship, we used a novel algorithm to cluster individuals into extended pedigrees, and used the methods of Crow and Mange to calculate the degree of kinship based on isonymy. Although the clustering algorithm grouped individuals into 336 pedigrees, 25,899 individuals (93%) were assigned to a single large pedigree. In addition, the coefficient of isonymy indicates that matings from the founder population share a common ancestor 8 generations past. In comparison, a 2001 analysis of isonymy in 247 US cities (including 10 Michigan cities) showed that matings within these cities share a common ancestor 9 to 12 generations past. Given this evidence for a high degree of relatedness and ongoing community interest, we are extending the research partnership beyond hearing loss to examine genetic and environmental factors involved in common health-related conditions, using a community-based participatory approach. The long term goal of this academic-community partnership is to foster gene discovery in a way that promotes wellness and quality of life for community partners and that fosters scholarship and vitality for academic partners.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:28:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:28:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.