2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159945
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Influencing Health Information-Seeking in Low-Income Pregnant Women
Abstract:
Factors Influencing Health Information-Seeking in Low-Income Pregnant Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Shieh, Carol, RNC, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University School of Nursing
Contact Address:1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:317-278-1575
Co-Authors:C. Shieh, Department of Environments for Health, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN; M. Broome, , Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN;
Enabling factors for information-seeking have been proposed in conceptual models of information behavior and consumer health promotion by Moorman and Matulich (1993), Rootman (2004), and Wilson (1999). These factors have yet to be examined in pregnant women. This study investigated: (1) the relationships between health information-seeking (HIS) and three enabling factors: health literacy, self-efficacy, and fetal health locus of control (FHLOC); and (2) the magnitude of the influence from these factors individually or together on HIS in low-income pregnant women. Methods: A cross-sectional correlational design was used. English-speaking pregnant women 18 years of age or older were recruited from a prenatal clinic serving low-income women. Health literacy, self-efficacy, FHLOC, and HIS were measured using the Short Form of the Test of Functional Health Literacy, the Health Information Competence Scale, the FHLOC Scale, and the Pregnancy Health Information-Seeking Scale. Results: 143 women participated in this study. The majority were Black, unmarried, unemployed, 20-29 years, multigravidas, and in their third trimester of pregnancy. Self-efficacy (r = .33, p < .0001) and internal FHLOC were significantly correlated with HIS (r = .26, p = .002). Self-efficacy (R2 = .11) exerted more influence on HIS than internal FHLOC (R2 = .07). Together with three covariates (first pregnancy, history of asthma, and read for pleasure), self-efficacy and internal FHLOC explained 29% of the variance in HIS, but only self-efficacy and first pregnancy remained statistically significant in the multivariable regression model. Conclusions: Self-efficacy was a stronger enabling factor than internal FHLOC for HIS in low-income pregnant women of this study, but health literacy was not. To facilitate pregnant women's information seeking, care providers can increase the women's confidence about their abilities to seek and find health information. First pregnancy also could be a teachable moment for pregnancy health promotion.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Influencing Health Information-Seeking in Low-Income Pregnant Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159945-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Influencing Health Information-Seeking in Low-Income Pregnant Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shieh, Carol, RNC, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317-278-1575</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wshieh@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. Shieh, Department of Environments for Health, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN; M. Broome, , Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Enabling factors for information-seeking have been proposed in conceptual models of information behavior and consumer health promotion by Moorman and Matulich (1993), Rootman (2004), and Wilson (1999). These factors have yet to be examined in pregnant women. This study investigated: (1) the relationships between health information-seeking (HIS) and three enabling factors: health literacy, self-efficacy, and fetal health locus of control (FHLOC); and (2) the magnitude of the influence from these factors individually or together on HIS in low-income pregnant women. Methods: A cross-sectional correlational design was used. English-speaking pregnant women 18 years of age or older were recruited from a prenatal clinic serving low-income women. Health literacy, self-efficacy, FHLOC, and HIS were measured using the Short Form of the Test of Functional Health Literacy, the Health Information Competence Scale, the FHLOC Scale, and the Pregnancy Health Information-Seeking Scale. Results: 143 women participated in this study. The majority were Black, unmarried, unemployed, 20-29 years, multigravidas, and in their third trimester of pregnancy. Self-efficacy (r = .33, p &lt; .0001) and internal FHLOC were significantly correlated with HIS (r = .26, p = .002). Self-efficacy (R2 = .11) exerted more influence on HIS than internal FHLOC (R2 = .07). Together with three covariates (first pregnancy, history of asthma, and read for pleasure), self-efficacy and internal FHLOC explained 29% of the variance in HIS, but only self-efficacy and first pregnancy remained statistically significant in the multivariable regression model. Conclusions: Self-efficacy was a stronger enabling factor than internal FHLOC for HIS in low-income pregnant women of this study, but health literacy was not. To facilitate pregnant women's information seeking, care providers can increase the women's confidence about their abilities to seek and find health information. First pregnancy also could be a teachable moment for pregnancy health promotion.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:28:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:28:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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