2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159946
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring Falls: A National Survey of Data Collection Processes
Abstract:
Measuring Falls: A National Survey of Data Collection Processes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Simon, Michael, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas Medical Center
Title:National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI)
Contact Address:3901 Rainbow Blvd., Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Contact Telephone:913-588-6127
Co-Authors:M. Simon, S.F. Klaus, N.E. Dunton, School of Nursing, NDNQI, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS;
Background: Falls are a serious health care quality concern and are endorsed as a nurse-sensitive patient outcome of the National Quality Forum (NQF). Based on Donabedian's quality framework the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) routinely collects unit level fall rates for more than 1,400 hospitals across the country. Hospital data collection processes influence the reliability and national standardization of fall rate performance measures for public reporting and pay-for performance. This study is among the first to systematically examine variation across hospitals in the composition of incident reporters, reporter training, and the content of incident reports. Methods: A web-based survey was conducted of 1,244 site coordinators representing more than 1,400 hospitals reporting falls data to NDNQI. An acceptable response rate (59%) was attained. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Findings: Initial fall reports are often or most often submitted by nurses (99%), followed by physical therapists (18%), nursing assistants (15%) and patient care technicians (12%). Electronic incident report systems were used in 72% of the hospitals of which 65% collect all information required to submit data on the NQF falls measure. 75% of the hospitals provide a written tutorial or other in-house training for falls; the other 25% provide general or no information about incident reporting. Half of the site coordinators must obtain additional information from the medical record to submit data required for the fall indicator. Relevance: Results underscore the important role of nurses in the collection of fall data and the submission of standardized data to NDNQI. Although most hospitals use electronic incident report systems 28% do not. Training provided by hospitals on fall reporting varies widely. With the incipient adoption of common incident formats across the U.S., this study identifies the importance of harmonized training for fall reporters.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring Falls: A National Survey of Data Collection Processesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159946-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measuring Falls: A National Survey of Data Collection Processes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Simon, Michael, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI)</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3901 Rainbow Blvd., Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">913-588-6127</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">msimon@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M. Simon, S.F. Klaus, N.E. Dunton, School of Nursing, NDNQI, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Falls are a serious health care quality concern and are endorsed as a nurse-sensitive patient outcome of the National Quality Forum (NQF). Based on Donabedian's quality framework the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) routinely collects unit level fall rates for more than 1,400 hospitals across the country. Hospital data collection processes influence the reliability and national standardization of fall rate performance measures for public reporting and pay-for performance. This study is among the first to systematically examine variation across hospitals in the composition of incident reporters, reporter training, and the content of incident reports. Methods: A web-based survey was conducted of 1,244 site coordinators representing more than 1,400 hospitals reporting falls data to NDNQI. An acceptable response rate (59%) was attained. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Findings: Initial fall reports are often or most often submitted by nurses (99%), followed by physical therapists (18%), nursing assistants (15%) and patient care technicians (12%). Electronic incident report systems were used in 72% of the hospitals of which 65% collect all information required to submit data on the NQF falls measure. 75% of the hospitals provide a written tutorial or other in-house training for falls; the other 25% provide general or no information about incident reporting. Half of the site coordinators must obtain additional information from the medical record to submit data required for the fall indicator. Relevance: Results underscore the important role of nurses in the collection of fall data and the submission of standardized data to NDNQI. Although most hospitals use electronic incident report systems 28% do not. Training provided by hospitals on fall reporting varies widely. With the incipient adoption of common incident formats across the U.S., this study identifies the importance of harmonized training for fall reporters.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:28:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:28:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.