Prevalence of Risky Driving Behaviors in an Urban, Emergency Department Sample: Opportunity for Targeted Interventions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159948
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prevalence of Risky Driving Behaviors in an Urban, Emergency Department Sample: Opportunity for Targeted Interventions
Abstract:
Prevalence of Risky Driving Behaviors in an Urban, Emergency Department Sample: Opportunity for Targeted Interventions
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Sommers, Marilyn, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pennsylvania
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:418 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA, 19104-6096, USA
Contact Telephone:513-314-9967
Co-Authors:M.S. Sommers, J. Fargo, , University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; M. Lyons, , University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH;
Background: Risky driving behaviors; behind-the-wheel activities such as speeding, driver inattention, aggressive lane changes, and ignoring traffic signals; are known to contribute to injury. A hospital Emergency Department (ED) visit may be the only contact with a healthcare provider that some people have each year and offers an opportunity for injury prevention counseling. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of risky driving behaviors in an urban ED sample. We used a conceptual model for risk-taking in young adults to guide the study. Methods: We operationalized risky driving as driving 20 plus mph over the speed limit, driving through yellow lights as they turned to red, and lack of seat belt use. We used a cross sectional design to collect data from a probability sample in an urban, Level I Trauma Center. Results: We screened 10,921 young adults 18-44 years (mean=31.2; SD=8.0); 51% were female, and 54% were African-American (41% White, 5% other). We found a 40% increase in the odds of speeding among 18-24 year olds as compared to 35-44 year olds (p<.0001), with the odds among males 43% greater than females (p<.0001). The expected frequency of running a yellow light was 21% higher among 18-24 year olds as compared to 25-34 year olds (p=.012), and 82% higher than 35-44 year olds (p<.0001). The expected rate was 37% higher among males than females (p < .0001). Sixty-nine percent of the sample always wore seatbelts. A binomial logistic regression analysis indicated that seatbelt use significantly varied by age, sex, and ethnicity. Conclusions: Risky driving practices are common behaviors in the urban ED population, and the ED should be considered an appropriate venue for targeted risky driving prevention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrevalence of Risky Driving Behaviors in an Urban, Emergency Department Sample: Opportunity for Targeted Interventionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159948-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Prevalence of Risky Driving Behaviors in an Urban, Emergency Department Sample: Opportunity for Targeted Interventions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sommers, Marilyn, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pennsylvania</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">418 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA, 19104-6096, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513-314-9967</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ssommer@nursing.upenn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">M.S. Sommers, J. Fargo, , University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; M. Lyons, , University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Risky driving behaviors; behind-the-wheel activities such as speeding, driver inattention, aggressive lane changes, and ignoring traffic signals; are known to contribute to injury. A hospital Emergency Department (ED) visit may be the only contact with a healthcare provider that some people have each year and offers an opportunity for injury prevention counseling. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of risky driving behaviors in an urban ED sample. We used a conceptual model for risk-taking in young adults to guide the study. Methods: We operationalized risky driving as driving 20 plus mph over the speed limit, driving through yellow lights as they turned to red, and lack of seat belt use. We used a cross sectional design to collect data from a probability sample in an urban, Level I Trauma Center. Results: We screened 10,921 young adults 18-44 years (mean=31.2; SD=8.0); 51% were female, and 54% were African-American (41% White, 5% other). We found a 40% increase in the odds of speeding among 18-24 year olds as compared to 35-44 year olds (p&lt;.0001), with the odds among males 43% greater than females (p&lt;.0001). The expected frequency of running a yellow light was 21% higher among 18-24 year olds as compared to 25-34 year olds (p=.012), and 82% higher than 35-44 year olds (p&lt;.0001). The expected rate was 37% higher among males than females (p &lt; .0001). Sixty-nine percent of the sample always wore seatbelts. A binomial logistic regression analysis indicated that seatbelt use significantly varied by age, sex, and ethnicity. Conclusions: Risky driving practices are common behaviors in the urban ED population, and the ED should be considered an appropriate venue for targeted risky driving prevention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:29:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:29:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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