Preference for Life-Sustaining Treatments of Older Adults in Nursing Homes and Their Families

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159953
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preference for Life-Sustaining Treatments of Older Adults in Nursing Homes and Their Families
Abstract:
Preference for Life-Sustaining Treatments of Older Adults in Nursing Homes and Their Families
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Suen, Lee-jen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Chang Jung Christian University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:396, Sec.1, Changrong Road, Gueiren, Tainan, Taiwan, 71101, ROC
Contact Telephone:886-6-2785933
Co-Authors:L.W. Suen, Nursing, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, TAIWAN;
Although older adults living in nursing homes have a relatively high mortality rate, end-of-life care issues are rarely discussed with them in Taiwan. Decisions regarding end-of-life treatment for older adults are usually made instead by their family members. This cross-sectional study examines preferences for life-sustaining treatments (antibiotics, CPR, surgery, and artificial nutrition) of older adults in nursing homes and of their families, should they have to make decisions for their loved ones, under eight hypothetical scenarios. The study included 90 pairs of nursing home residents and their families. The age of the older adults ranged from 60 to 101 (M = 79.6, SD = 8.5), 32% male and 68% female, and the age of the family member from 21 to 82 (M = 47.5, SD = 13). Eighty-six percent of residents versus 76% of family members believed that a terminal diagnosis should be disclosed to patients; 79% of residents versus 68% of family members believed that patients should know a terminal prognosis. Nursing home residents and their family members would forgo invasive procedures such as CPR or surgery in most of the hypothetical health conditions. The most desirable treatment was artificial feeding. Paired t-tests were performed to test the mean differences regarding life-sustaining treatment. Of the 32 items, 5 differed significantly (p<0.05) between the older adults and their families. Family members had higher desirability for CPR than their loved ones in terminal cancer without pain. On the other hand, nursing home residents had higher desirability for artificial nutrition and antibiotics than their family members for three health conditions. Health care providers and families should recognize that the families' decision may not always reflect the wishes of the older adults. Communication among health care providers, nursing home residents, and their families will help older adults receive the life-sustaining treatments they desire.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreference for Life-Sustaining Treatments of Older Adults in Nursing Homes and Their Familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159953-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preference for Life-Sustaining Treatments of Older Adults in Nursing Homes and Their Families</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Suen, Lee-jen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Chang Jung Christian University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">396, Sec.1, Changrong Road, Gueiren, Tainan, Taiwan, 71101, ROC</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">886-6-2785933</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ljwsuen@mail.cjcu.edu.tw</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">L.W. Suen, Nursing, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, TAIWAN;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although older adults living in nursing homes have a relatively high mortality rate, end-of-life care issues are rarely discussed with them in Taiwan. Decisions regarding end-of-life treatment for older adults are usually made instead by their family members. This cross-sectional study examines preferences for life-sustaining treatments (antibiotics, CPR, surgery, and artificial nutrition) of older adults in nursing homes and of their families, should they have to make decisions for their loved ones, under eight hypothetical scenarios. The study included 90 pairs of nursing home residents and their families. The age of the older adults ranged from 60 to 101 (M = 79.6, SD = 8.5), 32% male and 68% female, and the age of the family member from 21 to 82 (M = 47.5, SD = 13). Eighty-six percent of residents versus 76% of family members believed that a terminal diagnosis should be disclosed to patients; 79% of residents versus 68% of family members believed that patients should know a terminal prognosis. Nursing home residents and their family members would forgo invasive procedures such as CPR or surgery in most of the hypothetical health conditions. The most desirable treatment was artificial feeding. Paired t-tests were performed to test the mean differences regarding life-sustaining treatment. Of the 32 items, 5 differed significantly (p&lt;0.05) between the older adults and their families. Family members had higher desirability for CPR than their loved ones in terminal cancer without pain. On the other hand, nursing home residents had higher desirability for artificial nutrition and antibiotics than their family members for three health conditions. Health care providers and families should recognize that the families' decision may not always reflect the wishes of the older adults. Communication among health care providers, nursing home residents, and their families will help older adults receive the life-sustaining treatments they desire.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:29:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:29:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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