Innovative Partnerships for Clinical Nursing Education: Shared Issues Across Three Models

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159954
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Innovative Partnerships for Clinical Nursing Education: Shared Issues Across Three Models
Abstract:
Innovative Partnerships for Clinical Nursing Education: Shared Issues Across Three Models
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Teel, Cynthia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:3901 Rainbow Blvd., Mailstop 4043, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Contact Telephone:913-588-1697
Co-Authors:C.S. Teel, School of Nursing, University of Kansas , Kansas City, KS; R. MacIntyre, School of Nursing, Samuel Merritt University , Sacramento, CA; T. Murray, School of Nursing, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO;
With an estimated shortfall of 260,000 RNs by 2025, having a sufficient number of nurses is a serious workforce concern. In spite of the need for new nurses, over 40,000 qualified applicants were turned away from baccalaureate nursing programs in 2008, primarily because of shortages of faculty and clinical teaching sites. One approach to increasing enrollment is through innovative partnerships. The purpose of the current study was to locate innovative academic-service partnerships for expanding capacity in pre-licensure nursing programs, identify commonalities in successful projects, and make evidence-based recommendations for advancing the science of clinical education. The study team visited schools with innovative partnerships and conducted interviews with students, faculty, clinical staff, and administrators to learn about implementation challenges and outcomes. One school used a home-base hospital, precepted-learning approach. Each student was assigned to a primary clinical site and worked with a different preceptor on each new unit. Students became familiar with the single system and focused on patient care and professional role development. The second school coordinated precepted clinical experiences for students across a large metropolitan area. Multiple schools and dozens of hospitals participated, with each student assigned a preceptor for each clinical experience. Faculty and clinical partners commented on the benefits of working closely with all schools in the area. Students said they rapidly were oriented to the clinical culture, learned prioritization skills and became socialized into the professional role. The third school offered didactic content online and clinical experiences in one site, with one primary preceptor plus short-term experiences on specialty units. Students rapidly integrated into the patient care team and bridged classroom and clinical information. Four key issues were common across these clinical education partnerships: Supportive Relationships, Goodness of Fit, Flexibility, and Communication. The issues are explored and recommendations for advancing the science of clinical nursing education are proposed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInnovative Partnerships for Clinical Nursing Education: Shared Issues Across Three Modelsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159954-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Innovative Partnerships for Clinical Nursing Education: Shared Issues Across Three Models</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Teel, Cynthia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3901 Rainbow Blvd., Mailstop 4043, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">913-588-1697</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cteel@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.S. Teel, School of Nursing, University of Kansas , Kansas City, KS; R. MacIntyre, School of Nursing, Samuel Merritt University , Sacramento, CA; T. Murray, School of Nursing, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">With an estimated shortfall of 260,000 RNs by 2025, having a sufficient number of nurses is a serious workforce concern. In spite of the need for new nurses, over 40,000 qualified applicants were turned away from baccalaureate nursing programs in 2008, primarily because of shortages of faculty and clinical teaching sites. One approach to increasing enrollment is through innovative partnerships. The purpose of the current study was to locate innovative academic-service partnerships for expanding capacity in pre-licensure nursing programs, identify commonalities in successful projects, and make evidence-based recommendations for advancing the science of clinical education. The study team visited schools with innovative partnerships and conducted interviews with students, faculty, clinical staff, and administrators to learn about implementation challenges and outcomes. One school used a home-base hospital, precepted-learning approach. Each student was assigned to a primary clinical site and worked with a different preceptor on each new unit. Students became familiar with the single system and focused on patient care and professional role development. The second school coordinated precepted clinical experiences for students across a large metropolitan area. Multiple schools and dozens of hospitals participated, with each student assigned a preceptor for each clinical experience. Faculty and clinical partners commented on the benefits of working closely with all schools in the area. Students said they rapidly were oriented to the clinical culture, learned prioritization skills and became socialized into the professional role. The third school offered didactic content online and clinical experiences in one site, with one primary preceptor plus short-term experiences on specialty units. Students rapidly integrated into the patient care team and bridged classroom and clinical information. Four key issues were common across these clinical education partnerships: Supportive Relationships, Goodness of Fit, Flexibility, and Communication. The issues are explored and recommendations for advancing the science of clinical nursing education are proposed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:29:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:29:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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