Lessons Learned in Adapting and Modifying Self-Report Measures for Ethnic Minority and Culturally Diverse Groups

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159955
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Lessons Learned in Adapting and Modifying Self-Report Measures for Ethnic Minority and Culturally Diverse Groups
Abstract:
Lessons Learned in Adapting and Modifying Self-Report Measures for Ethnic Minority and Culturally Diverse Groups
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Templin, Thomas, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Contact Address:1424 Madison Drive, Troy, MI, 48083, USA
Contact Telephone:248-524-9461
Co-Authors:V. Hill Rice, L. Lewandowski, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; K. Patricia Williams, , Michigan State University, Lansing, MI; K. Aroian, , University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL; T.N. Templin, College of Nursing, Center for He
Many existing measures of functional health, stress, coping, and adjustment were developed in relatively homogeneous populations with little or no ethnic minority representation. Research in health disparities has stimulated interest in the validity of these measures and in the appropriate means of adapting and modifying them. Much has been learned in recent years including the authors' experiences in adapting self-report measures to different culturally specific (e.g., urban African American youth) and ethnic (e.g., Hispanic, and Arab) populations. The purpose of this presentation is to provide some general guidelines for psychometric evaluation of adapted and/or modified self-report measures. The approach is didactic, demonstrating in an intuitive and not overly technical way the effect of modifications on scale homogeneity, reliability, correlated measurement error, measurement invariance, and fit. Recent developments in the psychometric and structural equation modeling literature will be covered. Conclusions: Neither classic item analysis or confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) based on simple structure are sufficient. Multifactor measurement models that allow for factorially complex items, methods factors, and examination of correlated residuals are needed. To respect copyright and avoid difficulties that arise from modifying an existing instrument, it is recommended that when possible the original instrument is used intact and that modifications take the form of additional items or subscales. Reliability coefficients based on a CFA model should be considered, e.g., omega or hierarchical omega. The guidelines provided and the use of SEM methods are a powerful and practical way to evaluate modified and/or adapted instruments. Limitations to be discussed include sample size, missing data, seriously skewed items, and qualitative/categorical items.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLessons Learned in Adapting and Modifying Self-Report Measures for Ethnic Minority and Culturally Diverse Groupsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159955-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Lessons Learned in Adapting and Modifying Self-Report Measures for Ethnic Minority and Culturally Diverse Groups</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Templin, Thomas, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1424 Madison Drive, Troy, MI, 48083, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">248-524-9461</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">t.templin@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">V. Hill Rice, L. Lewandowski, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; K. Patricia Williams, , Michigan State University, Lansing, MI; K. Aroian, , University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL; T.N. Templin, College of Nursing, Center for He</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Many existing measures of functional health, stress, coping, and adjustment were developed in relatively homogeneous populations with little or no ethnic minority representation. Research in health disparities has stimulated interest in the validity of these measures and in the appropriate means of adapting and modifying them. Much has been learned in recent years including the authors' experiences in adapting self-report measures to different culturally specific (e.g., urban African American youth) and ethnic (e.g., Hispanic, and Arab) populations. The purpose of this presentation is to provide some general guidelines for psychometric evaluation of adapted and/or modified self-report measures. The approach is didactic, demonstrating in an intuitive and not overly technical way the effect of modifications on scale homogeneity, reliability, correlated measurement error, measurement invariance, and fit. Recent developments in the psychometric and structural equation modeling literature will be covered. Conclusions: Neither classic item analysis or confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) based on simple structure are sufficient. Multifactor measurement models that allow for factorially complex items, methods factors, and examination of correlated residuals are needed. To respect copyright and avoid difficulties that arise from modifying an existing instrument, it is recommended that when possible the original instrument is used intact and that modifications take the form of additional items or subscales. Reliability coefficients based on a CFA model should be considered, e.g., omega or hierarchical omega. The guidelines provided and the use of SEM methods are a powerful and practical way to evaluate modified and/or adapted instruments. Limitations to be discussed include sample size, missing data, seriously skewed items, and qualitative/categorical items.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:29:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:29:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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