2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159956
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Alcohol Abuse in Psychiatric Treatment
Abstract:
Alcohol Abuse in Psychiatric Treatment
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Thomas, Peggy, Masters in Nursing Science
P.I. Institution Name:Rush University Mdical Center
Title:Outpatient Psychiatry, Rush Day Hospital
Contact Address:1720 W.Harrison, Chicagto, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312 942-5000, 29907
Co-Authors:P.E. Thomas, C.M. Lafferty, D. Sanford, K.D. Pittman, Rush Day Hospital, Outpatient Psychiatry, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL;
Medication compliance with psychiatric patients is crucial. Alcohol consumption with psychotropic medications compromises treatment outcomes. The theoretical underpinning of this study is Bandura's social learning theory with emphasis on self efficacy and self regulation. This study's purpose was to introduce information about the physiology of alcohol within the body, to assess risk factors and to identify protective factors which would support abstinence from alcohol usage with psychotropic and other medications. There were a total of eight (8) 1-hour educational sessions conducted weekly over an 8-week period. Pre and post-tests were administered to each study subject. The Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) screening tool was also administered to each study subject pre-initiation and at the completion of the educational sessions. Data between tests were compared to measure individual as well as group outcomes. Each participant had a psychiatric diagnosis and was taking psychotropic medications. A paired t-test revealed that the post test scores on the educational component were higher than the pre test scores (p<.000). The analysis of the pre and post AUDIT scores revealed no statistically significant difference. The AUDIT results may have been due to the instrument's inability to adequately measure short term changes in alcohol usage and behavioral change. However, the results did indicate that the interventions impacted knowledge retention in the areas of physiology, identification of risk factors, and protective factors. This poses questions related to preventive interventions used to improve a patient's self efficacy and enabling him to improve decision-making, medication compliance, and treatment outcomes. Increased knowledge of genetics and other vulnerabilities as well as knowledge of contraindications to drinking while on psychotropic medications may support an increase in perceived self efficacy. This may be indicative of a beneficial preventive medicine intervention. Education and skill building may improve decision making and medication compliance. There may be a direct correlate to better treatment outcomes, self management and self efficacy through mastery experience and reinforcement within a group.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAlcohol Abuse in Psychiatric Treatmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159956-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Alcohol Abuse in Psychiatric Treatment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thomas, Peggy, Masters in Nursing Science</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rush University Mdical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Outpatient Psychiatry, Rush Day Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1720 W.Harrison, Chicagto, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312 942-5000, 29907</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Peggy_E_Thomas@rush.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">P.E. Thomas, C.M. Lafferty, D. Sanford, K.D. Pittman, Rush Day Hospital, Outpatient Psychiatry, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Medication compliance with psychiatric patients is crucial. Alcohol consumption with psychotropic medications compromises treatment outcomes. The theoretical underpinning of this study is Bandura's social learning theory with emphasis on self efficacy and self regulation. This study's purpose was to introduce information about the physiology of alcohol within the body, to assess risk factors and to identify protective factors which would support abstinence from alcohol usage with psychotropic and other medications. There were a total of eight (8) 1-hour educational sessions conducted weekly over an 8-week period. Pre and post-tests were administered to each study subject. The Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) screening tool was also administered to each study subject pre-initiation and at the completion of the educational sessions. Data between tests were compared to measure individual as well as group outcomes. Each participant had a psychiatric diagnosis and was taking psychotropic medications. A paired t-test revealed that the post test scores on the educational component were higher than the pre test scores (p&lt;.000). The analysis of the pre and post AUDIT scores revealed no statistically significant difference. The AUDIT results may have been due to the instrument's inability to adequately measure short term changes in alcohol usage and behavioral change. However, the results did indicate that the interventions impacted knowledge retention in the areas of physiology, identification of risk factors, and protective factors. This poses questions related to preventive interventions used to improve a patient's self efficacy and enabling him to improve decision-making, medication compliance, and treatment outcomes. Increased knowledge of genetics and other vulnerabilities as well as knowledge of contraindications to drinking while on psychotropic medications may support an increase in perceived self efficacy. This may be indicative of a beneficial preventive medicine intervention. Education and skill building may improve decision making and medication compliance. There may be a direct correlate to better treatment outcomes, self management and self efficacy through mastery experience and reinforcement within a group.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:29:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:29:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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