Physical Activity in Relation to Depressive Symptoms in Black U.S. Adults: Gender Differences

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159958
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physical Activity in Relation to Depressive Symptoms in Black U.S. Adults: Gender Differences
Abstract:
Physical Activity in Relation to Depressive Symptoms in Black U.S. Adults: Gender Differences
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Torres, Elisa, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:340 Nursing Building, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1121, USA
Contact Telephone:(734)255-3652
Co-Authors:E. Torres, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; E. Torres, C.M. Sampselle, K.A. Gretebeck, D.L. Ronis, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; H.W. Neighbors, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor,
Purpose: Physical activity (PA) decreases depressive symptoms in clinically depressed patients and healthy community samples. Few studies reported non-White participants, supporting a report by the U.S. Surgeon General that ethnic minorities are underrepresented in mental health research. Since the prevalence of PA and depressive symptoms differs by gender, this study investigated gender differences between PA and depressive symptoms in Black U.S. adults. Conceptual Framework: Stokols' Social Ecology of Health Promotion proposes understanding personal and environmental factors. Subjects: Participants were from the National Survey of American Life, a representative sample of Black women (n=2,960) and men (n=1,733), age range 18-94, M 43 plus or minus 16 years. Method: Secondary analysis was performed. T-tests and Chi-square for complex samples were used to determine gender differences on descriptive characteristics. Multiple regression for complex samples examined the relationship between PA and depressive symptoms while controlling for personal (sex, age, body mass index, disability, family history of depression and perceived discrimination) and environmental factors (ethnic origin, household income, region of country, neighborhood safety). Analyses were stratified by three types of PA, Bonferroni correction p<.0167. Results: Depressive symptoms were associated with sports/exercise in women (b = -.40, R2 = .22) and men (b = -.73, R2 = .17) and walking in women (b = -.28, R2 = .22), but not gardening/yardwork. Age, perceived discrimination, household income, disability and neighborhood safety in both genders also explained depressive symptoms. Family history of depression was related to depressive symptoms in women (b=1.72, p less than or equal to .001) but not men (b=0.70, p=.052). The relative importance of the variables differed by gender. Conclusion: Differences in gender and types of PA may be important attributes when considering PA interventions designed to decrease depressive symptoms in Black U.S. adults. Preliminary evidence is provided for addressing NINR's goals of understanding the health promotion and prevention of depressive symptoms in an understudied population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysical Activity in Relation to Depressive Symptoms in Black U.S. Adults: Gender Differencesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159958-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Physical Activity in Relation to Depressive Symptoms in Black U.S. Adults: Gender Differences</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Torres, Elisa, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">340 Nursing Building, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1121, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(734)255-3652</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">elisa-torres@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">E. Torres, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; E. Torres, C.M. Sampselle, K.A. Gretebeck, D.L. Ronis, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; H.W. Neighbors, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Physical activity (PA) decreases depressive symptoms in clinically depressed patients and healthy community samples. Few studies reported non-White participants, supporting a report by the U.S. Surgeon General that ethnic minorities are underrepresented in mental health research. Since the prevalence of PA and depressive symptoms differs by gender, this study investigated gender differences between PA and depressive symptoms in Black U.S. adults. Conceptual Framework: Stokols' Social Ecology of Health Promotion proposes understanding personal and environmental factors. Subjects: Participants were from the National Survey of American Life, a representative sample of Black women (n=2,960) and men (n=1,733), age range 18-94, M 43 plus or minus 16 years. Method: Secondary analysis was performed. T-tests and Chi-square for complex samples were used to determine gender differences on descriptive characteristics. Multiple regression for complex samples examined the relationship between PA and depressive symptoms while controlling for personal (sex, age, body mass index, disability, family history of depression and perceived discrimination) and environmental factors (ethnic origin, household income, region of country, neighborhood safety). Analyses were stratified by three types of PA, Bonferroni correction p&lt;.0167. Results: Depressive symptoms were associated with sports/exercise in women (b = -.40, R2 = .22) and men (b = -.73, R2 = .17) and walking in women (b = -.28, R2 = .22), but not gardening/yardwork. Age, perceived discrimination, household income, disability and neighborhood safety in both genders also explained depressive symptoms. Family history of depression was related to depressive symptoms in women (b=1.72, p less than or equal to .001) but not men (b=0.70, p=.052). The relative importance of the variables differed by gender. Conclusion: Differences in gender and types of PA may be important attributes when considering PA interventions designed to decrease depressive symptoms in Black U.S. adults. Preliminary evidence is provided for addressing NINR's goals of understanding the health promotion and prevention of depressive symptoms in an understudied population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:29:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:29:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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