The Influence of Coping Skills Training on Coping Preferences Among Low-Income African-American Teens with Asthma.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159960
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Influence of Coping Skills Training on Coping Preferences Among Low-Income African-American Teens with Asthma.
Abstract:
The Influence of Coping Skills Training on Coping Preferences Among Low-Income African-American Teens with Asthma.
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Velsor-Friedrich, Barbara, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chciago
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:9424 Monticello Avenue, Evanston, IL, 60203, USA
Contact Telephone:847-226-3339
Co-Authors:B. Velsor-Friedrich, L. Militello, Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL; I. Gross, J. Cunningham, P. Stevanovic, Psychology, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL;
Asthma is the most prevalent chronic illness in childhood, affecting over 9 million youth under the age of 17 years. African-American youth have a 23% higher prevalence rate of this disease than their White counterparts. Low-income African-American adolescents may routinely experience a range of uncontrollable stressful life events due to the social conditions of poverty and neighborhood tensions. Common stressors for these youth, such as community violence, have been linked to increased asthma symptoms. Research suggests that coping strategies may counteract the negative outcomes associated with stress. Current coping research however, is limited with regard to ethnicity and socioeconomic status, with the majority of studies focusing on white middle class adolescents. The objective of this NIH funded study is to evaluate the efficacy of a school-based program TEAM (Teen Education Asthma Management) on the self-care and coping strategies of low-income urban African-American teens with asthma. The TEAM program is composed of 1) asthma education, 2) coping skills training (CST) and 3) nurse practitioner re-enforcement visits. Coping Skills Training is a cognitive behavioral program that promotes the use of adaptive coping strategies among teens with a chronic disease. It consists of five sessions with two booster sessions. Eighty-four African-American students from four Chicago public high schools participated in the year long TEAM program. The Kid Cope Measure was used to asses ten coping strategies. Cognitive restructuring, social support, and problem solving were reported as the top three most frequently used coping strategies at baseline and post intervention. Preliminary results indicate that increased participation in CST sessions resulted in a significant decrease in the use of wishful thinking and seeking social support as coping strategies. While seeking social support is generally considered an adaptive response to stress, the quality of support that can be provided to these youth may be compromised as support resources may also be inundated with stressors associated with low-income status. This research provides important information regarding coping strategies and health outcomes for this underserved and understudied population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Influence of Coping Skills Training on Coping Preferences Among Low-Income African-American Teens with Asthma.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159960-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Influence of Coping Skills Training on Coping Preferences Among Low-Income African-American Teens with Asthma.</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Velsor-Friedrich, Barbara, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chciago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">9424 Monticello Avenue, Evanston, IL, 60203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">847-226-3339</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bvelsor@luc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">B. Velsor-Friedrich, L. Militello, Nursing, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL; I. Gross, J. Cunningham, P. Stevanovic, Psychology, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Asthma is the most prevalent chronic illness in childhood, affecting over 9 million youth under the age of 17 years. African-American youth have a 23% higher prevalence rate of this disease than their White counterparts. Low-income African-American adolescents may routinely experience a range of uncontrollable stressful life events due to the social conditions of poverty and neighborhood tensions. Common stressors for these youth, such as community violence, have been linked to increased asthma symptoms. Research suggests that coping strategies may counteract the negative outcomes associated with stress. Current coping research however, is limited with regard to ethnicity and socioeconomic status, with the majority of studies focusing on white middle class adolescents. The objective of this NIH funded study is to evaluate the efficacy of a school-based program TEAM (Teen Education Asthma Management) on the self-care and coping strategies of low-income urban African-American teens with asthma. The TEAM program is composed of 1) asthma education, 2) coping skills training (CST) and 3) nurse practitioner re-enforcement visits. Coping Skills Training is a cognitive behavioral program that promotes the use of adaptive coping strategies among teens with a chronic disease. It consists of five sessions with two booster sessions. Eighty-four African-American students from four Chicago public high schools participated in the year long TEAM program. The Kid Cope Measure was used to asses ten coping strategies. Cognitive restructuring, social support, and problem solving were reported as the top three most frequently used coping strategies at baseline and post intervention. Preliminary results indicate that increased participation in CST sessions resulted in a significant decrease in the use of wishful thinking and seeking social support as coping strategies. While seeking social support is generally considered an adaptive response to stress, the quality of support that can be provided to these youth may be compromised as support resources may also be inundated with stressors associated with low-income status. This research provides important information regarding coping strategies and health outcomes for this underserved and understudied population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:29:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:29:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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