2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159962
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality Improvement Teams Facilitate Technology Implementation
Abstract:
Quality Improvement Teams Facilitate Technology Implementation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Vogelsmeier, Amy, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:S314, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Contact Telephone:573 882 0658
Co-Authors:A. Vogelsmeier, School of Nursing, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; J. Halbesleben, Management and Marketing, University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire, WI; J. Cawiezell, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;
Conceptual Framework: Many technology systems introduce both intentional and unintentional work flow blocks that impact work processes ultimately posing a risk to patient safety. As staff encounter work flow blocks, they often engage in "first order" problem solving to individually work around the work flow block rather than "second order" problem solving to identify and understand underlying causes of the work flow block. Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to describe how focused quality improvement teams facilitated second order problem solving by identifying and understanding underlying causes of work flow blocks encountered by staff during the implementation of an electronic medication administration record. Subjects: Nurse leaders and medication staff from five mid-Western nursing homes. Methods: This secondary qualitative analysis explored how focused quality improvement teams used first order problem-solving behaviors of staff to identify and understand underlying causes of work flow blocks encountered with the implementation of an electronic medication administration record. Data were used from a larger federally funded intervention study to explore the impact of technology and focused quality improvement on medication safety practices and included data from direct observation and staff self-report. Open and axial coding techniques were used for analysis. Results: As staff shared experiences of individually problem solving work flow blocks, the quality improvement team explored and resolved underlying causes of the block. Underlying causes were related to both intentional and unintentional work flow blocks introduced by technology as well as existing work processes not reengineered to integrate effectively with the technology. Conclusion/Implications: This presentation provides important insight into how first order problem solving can be used to impact second order problem solving as leadership and staff come together as a quality improvement team to understand and resolve underlying work flow blocks that pose risk to medication safety.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality Improvement Teams Facilitate Technology Implementationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159962-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Quality Improvement Teams Facilitate Technology Implementation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vogelsmeier, Amy, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">S314, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573 882 0658</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vogelsmeiera@missouri.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A. Vogelsmeier, School of Nursing, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; J. Halbesleben, Management and Marketing, University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire, WI; J. Cawiezell, College of Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Conceptual Framework: Many technology systems introduce both intentional and unintentional work flow blocks that impact work processes ultimately posing a risk to patient safety. As staff encounter work flow blocks, they often engage in &quot;first order&quot; problem solving to individually work around the work flow block rather than &quot;second order&quot; problem solving to identify and understand underlying causes of the work flow block. Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to describe how focused quality improvement teams facilitated second order problem solving by identifying and understanding underlying causes of work flow blocks encountered by staff during the implementation of an electronic medication administration record. Subjects: Nurse leaders and medication staff from five mid-Western nursing homes. Methods: This secondary qualitative analysis explored how focused quality improvement teams used first order problem-solving behaviors of staff to identify and understand underlying causes of work flow blocks encountered with the implementation of an electronic medication administration record. Data were used from a larger federally funded intervention study to explore the impact of technology and focused quality improvement on medication safety practices and included data from direct observation and staff self-report. Open and axial coding techniques were used for analysis. Results: As staff shared experiences of individually problem solving work flow blocks, the quality improvement team explored and resolved underlying causes of the block. Underlying causes were related to both intentional and unintentional work flow blocks introduced by technology as well as existing work processes not reengineered to integrate effectively with the technology. Conclusion/Implications: This presentation provides important insight into how first order problem solving can be used to impact second order problem solving as leadership and staff come together as a quality improvement team to understand and resolve underlying work flow blocks that pose risk to medication safety.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:29:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:29:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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