The Effect of Strength/weight Training on Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Survivors with Bone Loss: A 24 Month Randomized Controlled Trial

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159965
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Strength/weight Training on Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Survivors with Bone Loss: A 24 Month Randomized Controlled Trial
Abstract:
The Effect of Strength/weight Training on Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Survivors with Bone Loss: A 24 Month Randomized Controlled Trial
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Waltman, Nancy, PhD, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:UNMC College of Nursing, 13th and O Street, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0220, USA
Contact Telephone:402-472-7354
Co-Authors:N. Waltman, G. Gross, J. Twiss, Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;
This study examined whether 24 months of strength/weight training (ST) exercises enhanced the effectiveness of risedronate, calcium, and vitamin D in increasing bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors (BCS) with bone loss. A second purpose was to determine whether subjects who participated in ST exercises along with taking medications were more likely to preserve BMD compared to subjects taking medications alone. Facilitative strategies (education, goal-setting, feedback), organized around Bandura's (1997) Self-Efficacy Theory were used to promote adherence to medications and exercises. 223 postmenopausal BCS from one Midwestern state randomly assigned to exercise or medication only groups. Exercise subjects received 24 months of 1200 mg of calcium and 400 IU of vitamin D supplements daily, 35 mg of risedronate weekly, and ST exercises twice weekly. Medication only subjects did not perform ST exercises. Intention-to-treat and per protocol analysis conducted using Chi square and Generalized Estimating Equation. Adherence to risedronate was 96.2%, to calcium/vitamin D supplements, 93.7%, and to ST exercises, 69.4%. After 24 months, women who took medications without exercising had significant improvements in BMD at total hip (plus 1.81%) and spine (plus 2.85%). However, 8.6% of subjects on medications alone still lost BMD at the total hip. Women who also exercised had additional increases (not significant) in BMD at femoral neck (plus 0.29%), total hip (plus 0.34%), spine (plus 0.23%), and total radius (plus 0.30%). An important finding was that only 2.3% of subjects who also participated in ST exercises (>50% adherent) lost BMD at the hip (Chi-Sq [1] = 4.66, p=.03). On average, postmenopausal BCS taking 24 months of risedronate, calcium, and vitamin D had improved BMD at the hip and spine. Compared to medication only subjects, subjects who also participated regularly in ST exercises were less likely to lose BMD at the hip. Key Words Breast cancer survivors, strength/weight training exercises, bone mineral density
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Strength/weight Training on Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Survivors with Bone Loss: A 24 Month Randomized Controlled Trialen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159965-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Strength/weight Training on Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Survivors with Bone Loss: A 24 Month Randomized Controlled Trial</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Waltman, Nancy, PhD, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">UNMC College of Nursing, 13th and O Street, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0220, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402-472-7354</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nwaltman@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N. Waltman, G. Gross, J. Twiss, Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract"> This study examined whether 24 months of strength/weight training (ST) exercises enhanced the effectiveness of risedronate, calcium, and vitamin D in increasing bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors (BCS) with bone loss. A second purpose was to determine whether subjects who participated in ST exercises along with taking medications were more likely to preserve BMD compared to subjects taking medications alone. Facilitative strategies (education, goal-setting, feedback), organized around Bandura's (1997) Self-Efficacy Theory were used to promote adherence to medications and exercises. 223 postmenopausal BCS from one Midwestern state randomly assigned to exercise or medication only groups. Exercise subjects received 24 months of 1200 mg of calcium and 400 IU of vitamin D supplements daily, 35 mg of risedronate weekly, and ST exercises twice weekly. Medication only subjects did not perform ST exercises. Intention-to-treat and per protocol analysis conducted using Chi square and Generalized Estimating Equation. Adherence to risedronate was 96.2%, to calcium/vitamin D supplements, 93.7%, and to ST exercises, 69.4%. After 24 months, women who took medications without exercising had significant improvements in BMD at total hip (plus 1.81%) and spine (plus 2.85%). However, 8.6% of subjects on medications alone still lost BMD at the total hip. Women who also exercised had additional increases (not significant) in BMD at femoral neck (plus 0.29%), total hip (plus 0.34%), spine (plus 0.23%), and total radius (plus 0.30%). An important finding was that only 2.3% of subjects who also participated in ST exercises (&gt;50% adherent) lost BMD at the hip (Chi-Sq [1] = 4.66, p=.03). On average, postmenopausal BCS taking 24 months of risedronate, calcium, and vitamin D had improved BMD at the hip and spine. Compared to medication only subjects, subjects who also participated regularly in ST exercises were less likely to lose BMD at the hip. Key Words Breast cancer survivors, strength/weight training exercises, bone mineral density</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:29:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:29:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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