2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159966
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Survivors of Sexual Violence and Altruism: Designing a Typology
Abstract:
Survivors of Sexual Violence and Altruism: Designing a Typology
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Warner Stidham, Andrea, Ph.D.
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Nursing
Contact Address:P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Contact Telephone:330-672-8831
Co-Authors:A. Warner Stidham, C. Draucker, College of Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH;
Sexual violence is a significant and prevalent problem in the United States that affects a substantial portion of the population. The consequences of sexual violence present persistent and difficult challenges for individuals. Coping resources affect how individuals deal with the effects of sexual violence. Helping others is one way people cope with, or heal from, sexual violence. Yet, not much is known about how helping others affects coping or recovery from sexual violence. Qualitative descriptive methods were used to describe the ways in which survivors of sexual violence engaged in altruism in response to their experiences with violence. Data to meet the specific aims for the proposed study was drawn from the project "Women's and Men's Responses to Sexual Violence" funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research (RO1, NR008230-01). Narrative descriptions of responses to sexual violence from 121 participants who were interviewed for the parent study were analyzed. Content analysis procedures yielded the Helping Others Typology. The Helping Others Typology contains nine categories that reflect the different ways in which survivors of sexual violence help others. The typology was compared with the Life Course Typology and each of the four frameworks of the parent study in order to understand how the findings regarding helping others are situated within the findings of the parent study. The results of this study suggest that helping others was a salient concern for most participants who experienced sexual violence. Participants indicated multiple and varied ways of helping others, such as protecting children, participating in the study, being understanding, thinking about helping, choosing a helping profession, providing guidance, providing advocacy, stopping perpetrators and speaking publicly. The findings suggest that gender and ethnicity may have affected how individuals engage in helping others. Results also indicated that participants must have experienced some healing from their experiences before they were able to actively engage in, or be effective in, helping others. Helping others was an aspect of participants' experiences of telling others about the violence, parenting, spirituality, and sexuality.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSurvivors of Sexual Violence and Altruism: Designing a Typologyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159966-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Survivors of Sexual Violence and Altruism: Designing a Typology</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Warner Stidham, Andrea, Ph.D.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-672-8831</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">awarner@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A. Warner Stidham, C. Draucker, College of Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Sexual violence is a significant and prevalent problem in the United States that affects a substantial portion of the population. The consequences of sexual violence present persistent and difficult challenges for individuals. Coping resources affect how individuals deal with the effects of sexual violence. Helping others is one way people cope with, or heal from, sexual violence. Yet, not much is known about how helping others affects coping or recovery from sexual violence. Qualitative descriptive methods were used to describe the ways in which survivors of sexual violence engaged in altruism in response to their experiences with violence. Data to meet the specific aims for the proposed study was drawn from the project &quot;Women's and Men's Responses to Sexual Violence&quot; funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research (RO1, NR008230-01). Narrative descriptions of responses to sexual violence from 121 participants who were interviewed for the parent study were analyzed. Content analysis procedures yielded the Helping Others Typology. The Helping Others Typology contains nine categories that reflect the different ways in which survivors of sexual violence help others. The typology was compared with the Life Course Typology and each of the four frameworks of the parent study in order to understand how the findings regarding helping others are situated within the findings of the parent study. The results of this study suggest that helping others was a salient concern for most participants who experienced sexual violence. Participants indicated multiple and varied ways of helping others, such as protecting children, participating in the study, being understanding, thinking about helping, choosing a helping profession, providing guidance, providing advocacy, stopping perpetrators and speaking publicly. The findings suggest that gender and ethnicity may have affected how individuals engage in helping others. Results also indicated that participants must have experienced some healing from their experiences before they were able to actively engage in, or be effective in, helping others. Helping others was an aspect of participants' experiences of telling others about the violence, parenting, spirituality, and sexuality.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:30:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:30:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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