2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159967
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Longitudinal Analysis of Nurse Leaders in U.S. Hospitals
Abstract:
Longitudinal Analysis of Nurse Leaders in U.S. Hospitals
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Westphal, Judith, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:800 Algoma Blvd, Oshkosh, WI, 54901, USA
Contact Telephone:920-203-1637
Co-Authors:J.A. Westphal, College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Oshkosh, WI;
Nurse leaders provide day to day supervision and overall guidance in the provision of patient care in U.S. hospitals and play a critical role in the recruitment and retention of staff. Effective leaders are members of collaborative patient care teams focused on quality. Changes in the nurse leader workforce may impact patient care as well as job satisfaction for nurses. The purpose of the study was to identify and describe the nurse leader workforce in U.S. hospitals over time by exploring the following research questions. What are the characteristics of the nurse leader workforce in U.S. hospitals? How has the nurse leader workforce changed over time? This non-experimental longitudinal research study explored group differences and similarities among nurse leaders. The Health Resources and Service Administration Bureau of Health Professions conducted the National Sample Surveys of Registered Nurses (NSSRN) in 1992, 1996, 2000 and 2004. The research participants were registered nurses with an active license to practice nursing in the U.S and were identified using a nested alpha segment design. The following changes were noted in the nurse leader workforce from 1992 to 2004: (a) mean age increased from 42.45 to 47.31 years, (b) those with masters or doctoral degrees increased from 14.5% in 1992 to 20.8% in 2004, (c) percentage of men in leadership positions increased by 1% and (d) number of nurses in leadership positions in U.S. hospitals decreased by approximately 28%. The racial background of nurse leaders is predominately white. The aging of nurse leaders highlights the need to prepare future leaders. Succession planning and management strategies may be critical for leadership development and staff retention. The rapid shift from inpatient care to outpatient care may be a reason for the decline of nurses in leadership positions in hospitals.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLongitudinal Analysis of Nurse Leaders in U.S. Hospitalsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159967-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Longitudinal Analysis of Nurse Leaders in U.S. Hospitals</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Westphal, Judith, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin Oshkosh</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">800 Algoma Blvd, Oshkosh, WI, 54901, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">920-203-1637</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">westphaj@uwosh.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J.A. Westphal, College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Oshkosh, WI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurse leaders provide day to day supervision and overall guidance in the provision of patient care in U.S. hospitals and play a critical role in the recruitment and retention of staff. Effective leaders are members of collaborative patient care teams focused on quality. Changes in the nurse leader workforce may impact patient care as well as job satisfaction for nurses. The purpose of the study was to identify and describe the nurse leader workforce in U.S. hospitals over time by exploring the following research questions. What are the characteristics of the nurse leader workforce in U.S. hospitals? How has the nurse leader workforce changed over time? This non-experimental longitudinal research study explored group differences and similarities among nurse leaders. The Health Resources and Service Administration Bureau of Health Professions conducted the National Sample Surveys of Registered Nurses (NSSRN) in 1992, 1996, 2000 and 2004. The research participants were registered nurses with an active license to practice nursing in the U.S and were identified using a nested alpha segment design. The following changes were noted in the nurse leader workforce from 1992 to 2004: (a) mean age increased from 42.45 to 47.31 years, (b) those with masters or doctoral degrees increased from 14.5% in 1992 to 20.8% in 2004, (c) percentage of men in leadership positions increased by 1% and (d) number of nurses in leadership positions in U.S. hospitals decreased by approximately 28%. The racial background of nurse leaders is predominately white. The aging of nurse leaders highlights the need to prepare future leaders. Succession planning and management strategies may be critical for leadership development and staff retention. The rapid shift from inpatient care to outpatient care may be a reason for the decline of nurses in leadership positions in hospitals.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:30:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:30:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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