2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159970
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Analgesic regimen adherence and unrelieved pain in a hospice population
Abstract:
Analgesic regimen adherence and unrelieved pain in a hospice population
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Wilkie, Diana, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:UIC
Title:Biobehavioral Health Science
Contact Address:845 S. Damen Ave, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312-413-5469
Co-Authors:D.J. Wilkie, Professor & Harriet H. Werley Endowed Chair for Nursing Research, Department of Biobehavioral Health Science, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, Chicago, IL; S.J. Stapleton, K. Lee, Doctoral Candidate, University of Illinoi
Aim: In two decades of research on adherence to prescribed analgesic regimens in patients with cancer, investigators have examined few factors that predict opioid adherence rates. We examined predictors of analgesic adherence (ratio of consumed to prescribed analgesics) in hospice patients with cancer from demographic, worst pain intensity, symptom distress, mood state, and sleep quality variables. Methods: Based on a multidimensional pain framework, we examined medication consumption within 24 hours of study enrollment from 123 adult hospice patients with cancer (45% male, age ranges from 20 to 92 years (M = 61, SD = 14.2), 45% AA, 45% Caucasian, and 10% other) who were experiencing pain on a daily basis and had a Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) score > 40. Participants completed the following instruments: Demographic Data Form (gender, age, race), Worst Pain Intensity (0-10), Symptom Distress Scale (SDS total score, 13-65), Mood State (0-10 scale), and Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI-6). We calculated adherence rates (24-hr dose consumed divided by 24-hr dose prescribed, multiplied by 100) for all analgesics. We performed a regression analysis to determine if opioid adherence rates could be predicted by gender, age, race, worst pain intensity, total SDS scores, mood state, sleep quality. Results: Worst pain intensity scores ranged from 0-10 (M = 7, SD = 2.8). SDS scores ranged from 19-54 (M = 34.6, SD = 8.3). Mood state ranged from 0 to 10 (M = 6.6, SD = 2.7). Participants indicated fairly good (42%) to very good (23%) sleep quality. Adherence rates by type of analgesic were: non-opioids (0% to 100% [M=28.8, SD=33.4]), NSAIDs (0% to 100% [M=67.4, SD=44.3]), Opioids (0% to 174% [M=42.9, SD=34.5]) and adjuvant drugs (0% to 300% [M=87.8, SD=61.3]). The regression analysis was not significant and failed to support our hypothesis (F (9,102)=1.1, p>.37). Conclusions: Our results confirm that adherence issues in hospice patients with cancer continue. We demonstrated a number of variables that did not predict adherence rates in our sample. Future research on adherence is indicated to explore other variables such as additional pain indices or pain management barriers from the perspective of patients, care-givers and hospice nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnalgesic regimen adherence and unrelieved pain in a hospice populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159970-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Analgesic regimen adherence and unrelieved pain in a hospice population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilkie, Diana, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UIC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Biobehavioral Health Science</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">845 S. Damen Ave, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312-413-5469</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">diwilkie@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">D.J. Wilkie, Professor &amp; Harriet H. Werley Endowed Chair for Nursing Research, Department of Biobehavioral Health Science, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, Chicago, IL; S.J. Stapleton, K. Lee, Doctoral Candidate, University of Illinoi</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim: In two decades of research on adherence to prescribed analgesic regimens in patients with cancer, investigators have examined few factors that predict opioid adherence rates. We examined predictors of analgesic adherence (ratio of consumed to prescribed analgesics) in hospice patients with cancer from demographic, worst pain intensity, symptom distress, mood state, and sleep quality variables. Methods: Based on a multidimensional pain framework, we examined medication consumption within 24 hours of study enrollment from 123 adult hospice patients with cancer (45% male, age ranges from 20 to 92 years (M = 61, SD = 14.2), 45% AA, 45% Caucasian, and 10% other) who were experiencing pain on a daily basis and had a Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) score &gt; 40. Participants completed the following instruments: Demographic Data Form (gender, age, race), Worst Pain Intensity (0-10), Symptom Distress Scale (SDS total score, 13-65), Mood State (0-10 scale), and Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI-6). We calculated adherence rates (24-hr dose consumed divided by 24-hr dose prescribed, multiplied by 100) for all analgesics. We performed a regression analysis to determine if opioid adherence rates could be predicted by gender, age, race, worst pain intensity, total SDS scores, mood state, sleep quality. Results: Worst pain intensity scores ranged from 0-10 (M = 7, SD = 2.8). SDS scores ranged from 19-54 (M = 34.6, SD = 8.3). Mood state ranged from 0 to 10 (M = 6.6, SD = 2.7). Participants indicated fairly good (42%) to very good (23%) sleep quality. Adherence rates by type of analgesic were: non-opioids (0% to 100% [M=28.8, SD=33.4]), NSAIDs (0% to 100% [M=67.4, SD=44.3]), Opioids (0% to 174% [M=42.9, SD=34.5]) and adjuvant drugs (0% to 300% [M=87.8, SD=61.3]). The regression analysis was not significant and failed to support our hypothesis (F (9,102)=1.1, p&gt;.37). Conclusions: Our results confirm that adherence issues in hospice patients with cancer continue. We demonstrated a number of variables that did not predict adherence rates in our sample. Future research on adherence is indicated to explore other variables such as additional pain indices or pain management barriers from the perspective of patients, care-givers and hospice nurses.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:30:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:30:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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