2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159975
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlates of Depression in African Americans Enrolled in Cardiac Rehabilitation
Abstract:
Correlates of Depression in African Americans Enrolled in Cardiac Rehabilitation
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Artinian, Nancy, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:5557 Cass Ave., Room 319 Cohn, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:(313) 577-4135
Co-Authors:N.T. Artinian, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; J. Abrams, , Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI; S. Keteyian, , Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI; M. Franks, , Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; B. Franklin, , William Beaumo
Background: Individuals with established cardiovascular disease and concomitant depression have a greater risk of death and comorbid clinical events, and are less likely to adhere to recommended cardioprotective lifestyle changes. Despite its prognostic importance, depression and associated factors are sometimes poorly recognized, particularly among minorities. Purpose: To explore differences in psychosocial factors associated with symptoms of depression (CES-D score >16) among African Americans enrolled in phase 2 exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. The theory of stress-induced depression guided this study. Methods: A two-group comparative design was used. A non-random sample of 112 men and women was recruited through local phase 2 cardiac rehabilitation programs. Data were obtained by a structured interview and physical exam using several reliable and valid instruments. Chi-square tests, Kruskal-Wallis two-sample tests, Spearman's rank correlation coefficients, and logistic regression models were used for analyses. Results: We found that 30% of the participants met the criterion for depression. Demographic characteristics were not significantly different between individuals with and without symptoms of depression. However, depressed individuals (n=34) were more likely to be dissatisfied with their neighborhoods (p=0.01), have lower optimism scores (p<0.0001), higher stress scores (p<0.0001), lower adaptive coping scores (p=0.05) and higher problematic coping scores (p<0.01) than their counterparts who were not depressed. In the multivariable logistic regression model, the odds of depression increased with stress (p<0.001) and decreased with optimism (p=0.03); none of the other psychosocial characteristics had an independent effect on depression. Conclusions: A substantial percentage of African American participants enrolled in cardiac rehabilitation had symptoms of depression that there were identified individually and collectively by multiple psychosocial characteristics. Including culturally specific depression-reducing interventions targeting factors such as stress, adaptive coping strategies, and optimism within cardiac rehabilitation programs should be examined in future research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelates of Depression in African Americans Enrolled in Cardiac Rehabilitationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159975-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Correlates of Depression in African Americans Enrolled in Cardiac Rehabilitation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Artinian, Nancy, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5557 Cass Ave., Room 319 Cohn, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(313) 577-4135</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">n.artinian@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N.T. Artinian, College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI; J. Abrams, , Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI; S. Keteyian, , Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI; M. Franks, , Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; B. Franklin, , William Beaumo</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Individuals with established cardiovascular disease and concomitant depression have a greater risk of death and comorbid clinical events, and are less likely to adhere to recommended cardioprotective lifestyle changes. Despite its prognostic importance, depression and associated factors are sometimes poorly recognized, particularly among minorities. Purpose: To explore differences in psychosocial factors associated with symptoms of depression (CES-D score &gt;16) among African Americans enrolled in phase 2 exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. The theory of stress-induced depression guided this study. Methods: A two-group comparative design was used. A non-random sample of 112 men and women was recruited through local phase 2 cardiac rehabilitation programs. Data were obtained by a structured interview and physical exam using several reliable and valid instruments. Chi-square tests, Kruskal-Wallis two-sample tests, Spearman's rank correlation coefficients, and logistic regression models were used for analyses. Results: We found that 30% of the participants met the criterion for depression. Demographic characteristics were not significantly different between individuals with and without symptoms of depression. However, depressed individuals (n=34) were more likely to be dissatisfied with their neighborhoods (p=0.01), have lower optimism scores (p&lt;0.0001), higher stress scores (p&lt;0.0001), lower adaptive coping scores (p=0.05) and higher problematic coping scores (p&lt;0.01) than their counterparts who were not depressed. In the multivariable logistic regression model, the odds of depression increased with stress (p&lt;0.001) and decreased with optimism (p=0.03); none of the other psychosocial characteristics had an independent effect on depression. Conclusions: A substantial percentage of African American participants enrolled in cardiac rehabilitation had symptoms of depression that there were identified individually and collectively by multiple psychosocial characteristics. Including culturally specific depression-reducing interventions targeting factors such as stress, adaptive coping strategies, and optimism within cardiac rehabilitation programs should be examined in future research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:30:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:30:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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