Mental Health Variables Related to Smoking Behavior Among Immigrants from the Former Soviet Union

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159978
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mental Health Variables Related to Smoking Behavior Among Immigrants from the Former Soviet Union
Abstract:
Mental Health Variables Related to Smoking Behavior Among Immigrants from the Former Soviet Union
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Baker, Cathy, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:School of Nursing
Contact Address:, Cleveland Heights, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216-371-1915
Co-Authors:C.J. Baker, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; K. Ahijevych, Nursing, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH;
Description of cigarette smoking behavior and beliefs in high risk ethnic groups is a critical step to bringing cultural considerations into tobacco cessation interventions. This study focused on variables related to smoking behavior among immigrants from former Soviet Union (FSU) countries, with high smoking prevalence (53-63% men). A descriptive, correlational design was employed with 80 participants immigrating within the last 20 years, including men and women, smokers and non-smokers. Variable selection was guided by The Biobehavioral Model of Tobacco Use, which depicts biological and behavioral factors both influencing and being influenced by tobacco use. Study variables included depressive symptoms, acculturation, acculturative stress, level of tobacco use, salivary cotinine (the major metabolite of nicotine), nicotine dependence, decisional balance, and reasons for smoking. Results showed high identification with both dominant and ethnic cultures, though ethnic identification was significantly higher (N=80). Moderate levels of acculturative stress were found, which were not correlated with number of years since immigration. Depression score was positively correlated with acculturative stress, with 52% scoring above the instrument's cut-point for further evaluation. Depression was negatively correlated with dominant society immersion and positively correlated with ethnic society immersion. In current smokers (n=26), depression was negatively correlated with number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD). A regression model including the Craving and Habit subscales from the Reasons for Smoking scale and depression score best predicted CPD, explaining 68% of the variance. Higher levels of Craving and Habit and less depressive symptoms were associated with higher CPD. Cotinine level was predicted by time to first cigarette of the day. In this culture, smoking may be an important part of stress management and social connectedness and may provide protective effects against depressive symptoms, for which FSU immigrants appear to be at risk. Smoking cessation interventions addressing acculturative stress and maintaining social connections are essential.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMental Health Variables Related to Smoking Behavior Among Immigrants from the Former Soviet Unionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159978-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mental Health Variables Related to Smoking Behavior Among Immigrants from the Former Soviet Union</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baker, Cathy, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Cleveland Heights, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216-371-1915</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">baker.55@osu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C.J. Baker, Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; K. Ahijevych, Nursing, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Description of cigarette smoking behavior and beliefs in high risk ethnic groups is a critical step to bringing cultural considerations into tobacco cessation interventions. This study focused on variables related to smoking behavior among immigrants from former Soviet Union (FSU) countries, with high smoking prevalence (53-63% men). A descriptive, correlational design was employed with 80 participants immigrating within the last 20 years, including men and women, smokers and non-smokers. Variable selection was guided by The Biobehavioral Model of Tobacco Use, which depicts biological and behavioral factors both influencing and being influenced by tobacco use. Study variables included depressive symptoms, acculturation, acculturative stress, level of tobacco use, salivary cotinine (the major metabolite of nicotine), nicotine dependence, decisional balance, and reasons for smoking. Results showed high identification with both dominant and ethnic cultures, though ethnic identification was significantly higher (N=80). Moderate levels of acculturative stress were found, which were not correlated with number of years since immigration. Depression score was positively correlated with acculturative stress, with 52% scoring above the instrument's cut-point for further evaluation. Depression was negatively correlated with dominant society immersion and positively correlated with ethnic society immersion. In current smokers (n=26), depression was negatively correlated with number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD). A regression model including the Craving and Habit subscales from the Reasons for Smoking scale and depression score best predicted CPD, explaining 68% of the variance. Higher levels of Craving and Habit and less depressive symptoms were associated with higher CPD. Cotinine level was predicted by time to first cigarette of the day. In this culture, smoking may be an important part of stress management and social connectedness and may provide protective effects against depressive symptoms, for which FSU immigrants appear to be at risk. Smoking cessation interventions addressing acculturative stress and maintaining social connections are essential.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:30:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:30:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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