Nursing Practice Self-Efficacy and Nursing Practice Outcome Expectations for Baccalaureate Nursing Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159980
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Practice Self-Efficacy and Nursing Practice Outcome Expectations for Baccalaureate Nursing Students
Abstract:
Nursing Practice Self-Efficacy and Nursing Practice Outcome Expectations for Baccalaureate Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Pakieser-Reed, Katherine, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Contact Address:Nursing, Grayslake, IL, 60030, USA
The health care system is facing an unprecedented demand for nurses. Potentially there will be a nursing shortage in the United States of 808,000 registered nurses (RNs) by 2020. Retention of RNs, and especially new and younger RNs, is critical to reducing the potential shortage. However, very little is known about effective retention strategies for new and younger RNs. The Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) suggests that self-efficacy and outcome expectations are key variables that predict retention. Instruments to measure nursing practice self-efficacy (NPSE) and nursing practice outcome expectations (NPOE) were developed for this study. Based on analyses of responses from 526 baccalaureate nursing students from 7 Midwestern schools, results indicated that students differentiated NPSE into Global and Patient variables and NPOE into External and Internal variables. Correlations between the NPSEs and NPOEs and students' demographic, learning experiences, and goals indicated significant relationships. The NPSEs and NPOEs significantly, but weakly, predicted students' future goals. Findings from this study could assist with developing appropriate retention strategies for new and younger RNs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Practice Self-Efficacy and Nursing Practice Outcome Expectations for Baccalaureate Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159980-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Practice Self-Efficacy and Nursing Practice Outcome Expectations for Baccalaureate Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pakieser-Reed, Katherine, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, Grayslake, IL, 60030, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kpak45@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The health care system is facing an unprecedented demand for nurses. Potentially there will be a nursing shortage in the United States of 808,000 registered nurses (RNs) by 2020. Retention of RNs, and especially new and younger RNs, is critical to reducing the potential shortage. However, very little is known about effective retention strategies for new and younger RNs. The Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) suggests that self-efficacy and outcome expectations are key variables that predict retention. Instruments to measure nursing practice self-efficacy (NPSE) and nursing practice outcome expectations (NPOE) were developed for this study. Based on analyses of responses from 526 baccalaureate nursing students from 7 Midwestern schools, results indicated that students differentiated NPSE into Global and Patient variables and NPOE into External and Internal variables. Correlations between the NPSEs and NPOEs and students' demographic, learning experiences, and goals indicated significant relationships. The NPSEs and NPOEs significantly, but weakly, predicted students' future goals. Findings from this study could assist with developing appropriate retention strategies for new and younger RNs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:30:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:30:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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