The Effect of Individualized Music on Agitation in Patients With Dementia Who Live at Home

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159981
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Individualized Music on Agitation in Patients With Dementia Who Live at Home
Abstract:
The Effect of Individualized Music on Agitation in Patients With Dementia Who Live at Home
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Park, Heeok, PhD Candidate
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Iowa
Contact Address:Nursing, Iowa City, IA, 52246, USA
Co-Authors:J. Specht and H. Butcher, Nursing, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; M. Adamek, Music, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; T. Ansley, Education, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; and L. Gerdner, Nursing, U.of MN, Minneapolis, MN
Agitation in patients with dementia has been a dominant health problem. The effect of music intervention on agitation was significant, but there is no study for community-dwelling patients with dementia. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of individualized music on agitation in patients with dementia living at home. A cross-over design was used investigate: 1) the difference in agitation before, during, and after music intervention and 2) the difference in agitation between music and no music intervention. Persons with dementia were recruited from an AOA (Administration of Aging) demonstration project from September 2006. A total of 20 patients with dementia will participate in this study until December 2006. Inclusion criteria was as follows: 1) diagnosed with dementia; 2) living at home; 3) aged over 65; 4) showing agitation at least once a day as defined by Cohen-Mansfield (1986); 5) can hear normal speaking voice at a distance of 1.5 feet; 6) available information about preferred music from subjects or family members; and 7) an available consent form from subjects or family members. The participants in group A listened to individualized music using CD players for 30 minutes, twice a week, and a total of two weeks, followed by no music for two weeks. They repeated the same process one more time. The participants in group B listened to no music for two weeks, followed by individualized music for 30 minutes, twice a week, and a total of two weeks. They repeated the same process one more time. Agitation level was measured for 30 minutes before, during, and after music intervention. Modified-Assessment of Personal Music Preference was used to assess patients' preferred music (Gerdner, 2000). Modified Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory was used to measure patients' agitation peak time and agitation level (Cohen-Mansfield & Billig, 1986). Mini-Mental State Exam was used to assess cognitive impairment level (Folstein, Folstein, & McHugh, 1975). The two factor linear mixed model for repeated measures will be used to analyze the data using the SAS program after completing data collection on December 2006. The positive effect of music intervention on agitation in community-dwelling patients with dementia is expected.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Individualized Music on Agitation in Patients With Dementia Who Live at Homeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159981-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Individualized Music on Agitation in Patients With Dementia Who Live at Home</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Park, Heeok, PhD Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, Iowa City, IA, 52246, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">heeok-park@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J. Specht and H. Butcher, Nursing, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; M. Adamek, Music, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; T. Ansley, Education, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; and L. Gerdner, Nursing, U.of MN, Minneapolis, MN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Agitation in patients with dementia has been a dominant health problem. The effect of music intervention on agitation was significant, but there is no study for community-dwelling patients with dementia. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of individualized music on agitation in patients with dementia living at home. A cross-over design was used investigate: 1) the difference in agitation before, during, and after music intervention and 2) the difference in agitation between music and no music intervention. Persons with dementia were recruited from an AOA (Administration of Aging) demonstration project from September 2006. A total of 20 patients with dementia will participate in this study until December 2006. Inclusion criteria was as follows: 1) diagnosed with dementia; 2) living at home; 3) aged over 65; 4) showing agitation at least once a day as defined by Cohen-Mansfield (1986); 5) can hear normal speaking voice at a distance of 1.5 feet; 6) available information about preferred music from subjects or family members; and 7) an available consent form from subjects or family members. The participants in group A listened to individualized music using CD players for 30 minutes, twice a week, and a total of two weeks, followed by no music for two weeks. They repeated the same process one more time. The participants in group B listened to no music for two weeks, followed by individualized music for 30 minutes, twice a week, and a total of two weeks. They repeated the same process one more time. Agitation level was measured for 30 minutes before, during, and after music intervention. Modified-Assessment of Personal Music Preference was used to assess patients' preferred music (Gerdner, 2000). Modified Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory was used to measure patients' agitation peak time and agitation level (Cohen-Mansfield &amp; Billig, 1986). Mini-Mental State Exam was used to assess cognitive impairment level (Folstein, Folstein, &amp; McHugh, 1975). The two factor linear mixed model for repeated measures will be used to analyze the data using the SAS program after completing data collection on December 2006. The positive effect of music intervention on agitation in community-dwelling patients with dementia is expected.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:30:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:30:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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