The Use of Hypothesis Testing in Nursing Research During Two Decades: 1980-1989 and 1990-1999

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159982
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Use of Hypothesis Testing in Nursing Research During Two Decades: 1980-1989 and 1990-1999
Author(s):
Plonczynski, Donna; Lash, A. A.
Abstract:
The Use of Hypothesis Testing in Nursing Research During Two Decades: 1980-1989 and 1990-1999
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Plonczynski, Donna, PhD, APN
P.I. Institution Name:NIU
Contact Address:Nursing, DeKalb, IL, 60134, USA
Co-Authors:A. A.Lash, Nursing, NIU, DeKalb, IL
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the use of hypothesis testing in nursing research during the 1980s with the 1990s through analyses of studies published in Nursing Research. Variables examined were: study purpose (prediction/control, explanation, exploration, descriptive), statement of hypotheses, and type of doctorate held by authors (PhD, DNS/DNSc, EdD, other). Independently evaluated research variables by two researchers gave a significant kappa statistic. Background: Traditionally, hypothesis testing has lead to the generality of findings and provided disciplines with dependable knowledge. However, a trend was observed of decreased hypothesis testing in nursing research articles commencing in the mid 1980s. Method: Random retrospective design was used. Articles from the 1980s (1980, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1987), and the 1990s (1990, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996) were identified through the use of random numbers table (n=582). After eliminating non-research articles, 517 remained for analyses. Results: Overall, only 29% of the articles published during the two decades stated a hypothesis. During the 80s, 35% (98/273) stated at least one hypothesis, but during the 90s, only 21% (52/244) did so. This decrease was statistically significant by decade (chi 2 = 13.31(1) p<.01). A statistically significant trend towards a decreased use of hypothesis by year also emerged (F = 5.18(9), p<.01): decreasing use of hypothesis testing began in the mid 80s, plummeting sharply by the mid 90s. Logistic linear model showed the type of doctorate held by the first author had no impact on hypothesis testing (F = .0.27 (3), p=.84). However, the level of purpose had a significant relationship with hypothesis testing as the prediction/control studies stated the fewest hypotheses (F = 14.38(3), p<.01). Implications: Nursing research studies show a significant trend towards a declining use of hypothesis testing. Findings have important implications for nursing science and doctoral education in nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Use of Hypothesis Testing in Nursing Research During Two Decades: 1980-1989 and 1990-1999en_GB
dc.contributor.authorPlonczynski, Donnaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLash, A. A.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159982-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Use of Hypothesis Testing in Nursing Research During Two Decades: 1980-1989 and 1990-1999</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Plonczynski, Donna, PhD, APN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">NIU</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, DeKalb, IL, 60134, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">djplonz@niu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">A. A.Lash, Nursing, NIU, DeKalb, IL</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the use of hypothesis testing in nursing research during the 1980s with the 1990s through analyses of studies published in Nursing Research. Variables examined were: study purpose (prediction/control, explanation, exploration, descriptive), statement of hypotheses, and type of doctorate held by authors (PhD, DNS/DNSc, EdD, other). Independently evaluated research variables by two researchers gave a significant kappa statistic. Background: Traditionally, hypothesis testing has lead to the generality of findings and provided disciplines with dependable knowledge. However, a trend was observed of decreased hypothesis testing in nursing research articles commencing in the mid 1980s. Method: Random retrospective design was used. Articles from the 1980s (1980, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1987), and the 1990s (1990, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996) were identified through the use of random numbers table (n=582). After eliminating non-research articles, 517 remained for analyses. Results: Overall, only 29% of the articles published during the two decades stated a hypothesis. During the 80s, 35% (98/273) stated at least one hypothesis, but during the 90s, only 21% (52/244) did so. This decrease was statistically significant by decade (chi 2 = 13.31(1) p<.01). A statistically significant trend towards a decreased use of hypothesis by year also emerged (F = 5.18(9), p<.01): decreasing use of hypothesis testing began in the mid 80s, plummeting sharply by the mid 90s. Logistic linear model showed the type of doctorate held by the first author had no impact on hypothesis testing (F = .0.27 (3), p=.84). However, the level of purpose had a significant relationship with hypothesis testing as the prediction/control studies stated the fewest hypotheses (F = 14.38(3), p<.01). Implications: Nursing research studies show a significant trend towards a declining use of hypothesis testing. Findings have important implications for nursing science and doctoral education in nursing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:30:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:30:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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