2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159983
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Heart Failure Symptom Survey: Reliability and Validity
Abstract:
Heart Failure Symptom Survey: Reliability and Validity
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Pozehl, Bunny, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:UNMC College of Nursing
Contact Address:PO Box 880220, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0220, USA
Co-Authors:K. Duncan, and M. Hertzog, , University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing, Lincoln, NE
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Heart Failure Symptom Survey (HFSS). Sample: A random sample of 300 subjects was obtained from a midwestern heart failure (HF) clinic. Surveys were mailed to subjects and 138 subjects responded with complete data for a return rate of 46%. The sample respondents were 33 women and 105 men with a mean age of 70.6 + 9.7 years and a mean EF of 34 + 10.9%. The majority of subjects were NYHA Class II (38.1%) and Class III (51.8%) with 66.2% having ischemic HF and 33.8% with nonischemic HF. Methods: The HFSS is a 14 item, investigator developed instrument to measure frequency and severity of symptoms experienced by HF patients in the past seven days. Frequency and severity were measured on a 0-10 scale (0 = never, 10 = very frequently or very severe). Interference with physical activity and enjoyment of life were also assessed on a 0-10 scale (0 = no interference, 10 = great deal of interference) for each of the 14 symptoms. Internal consistency reliability estimates were obtained for the HFSS. The Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) was utilized to evaluate construct validity. The KCCQ has a total symptom score that assesses frequency and burden of dyspnea and fatigue. Results: Frequency, severity, interference with physical activity and interference with enjoyment of life were treated as individual HFSS subscales and Cronbach alpha coefficients were .80, .87, .88 and .88, respectively. Convergent validity was indicated by the Pearson correlations ranging from -.62 to -.78 between the subscales of the HFSS and the KCCQ (See Table 1). Higher scores on the HFSS indicate greater symptomology while lower scores on the KCCQ indicate greater impairment. Known group validity was also assessed for HFSS frequency and severity according to NYHA class. Mean frequency [F (3,127) = 9.57, p < .001] and severity of symptoms [F(3,128) = 7.42, p < .001] increased significantly from NYHA Class I to Class IV. Conclusions: Findings indicate the HFSS is a valid and reliable instrument for assessment of common symptoms experienced by HF patients. Implications: A valid and reliable measure of HF symptoms is necessary in order to evaluate and document HF patient symptom status over time.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHeart Failure Symptom Survey: Reliability and Validityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159983-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Heart Failure Symptom Survey: Reliability and Validity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pozehl, Bunny, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UNMC College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 880220, Lincoln, NE, 68588-0220, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bpozehl@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">K. Duncan, and M. Hertzog, , University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing, Lincoln, NE</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Heart Failure Symptom Survey (HFSS). Sample: A random sample of 300 subjects was obtained from a midwestern heart failure (HF) clinic. Surveys were mailed to subjects and 138 subjects responded with complete data for a return rate of 46%. The sample respondents were 33 women and 105 men with a mean age of 70.6 + 9.7 years and a mean EF of 34 + 10.9%. The majority of subjects were NYHA Class II (38.1%) and Class III (51.8%) with 66.2% having ischemic HF and 33.8% with nonischemic HF. Methods: The HFSS is a 14 item, investigator developed instrument to measure frequency and severity of symptoms experienced by HF patients in the past seven days. Frequency and severity were measured on a 0-10 scale (0 = never, 10 = very frequently or very severe). Interference with physical activity and enjoyment of life were also assessed on a 0-10 scale (0 = no interference, 10 = great deal of interference) for each of the 14 symptoms. Internal consistency reliability estimates were obtained for the HFSS. The Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) was utilized to evaluate construct validity. The KCCQ has a total symptom score that assesses frequency and burden of dyspnea and fatigue. Results: Frequency, severity, interference with physical activity and interference with enjoyment of life were treated as individual HFSS subscales and Cronbach alpha coefficients were .80, .87, .88 and .88, respectively. Convergent validity was indicated by the Pearson correlations ranging from -.62 to -.78 between the subscales of the HFSS and the KCCQ (See Table 1). Higher scores on the HFSS indicate greater symptomology while lower scores on the KCCQ indicate greater impairment. Known group validity was also assessed for HFSS frequency and severity according to NYHA class. Mean frequency [F (3,127) = 9.57, p &lt; .001] and severity of symptoms [F(3,128) = 7.42, p &lt; .001] increased significantly from NYHA Class I to Class IV. Conclusions: Findings indicate the HFSS is a valid and reliable instrument for assessment of common symptoms experienced by HF patients. Implications: A valid and reliable measure of HF symptoms is necessary in order to evaluate and document HF patient symptom status over time.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:31:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:31:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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