Parents' Internal Working Models of Caregiving Through the First Year for Infants With a Complex Congenital Heart Defect

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159984
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parents' Internal Working Models of Caregiving Through the First Year for Infants With a Complex Congenital Heart Defect
Abstract:
Parents' Internal Working Models of Caregiving Through the First Year for Infants With a Complex Congenital Heart Defect
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Pridham, Karen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Madison
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Madison, WI, 53726-4054, USA
Co-Authors:T. Harrison and M.E. Bathum, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Madison; M. Krolikowski, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; J.W. Winters, Marquette University, Milwaukee; & K. Mussatto, R. Fedderly, Pediatrics, Medical College of Wiscons
Our purpose was to examine aspects of the internal working model (IWM) of caregiving described by parents of infants with a complex congenital heart defect (CCHD) during the first year. We used an informational content analysis of 52 transcriptions from 3-4 semi-structured interviews with 15 parental caregivers, most often mother with father sometimes present. Two parents were minority; age ranged from 21-36 years and education from 11-16 years. All infants had a surgically repaired or palliated CCHD. Parents' narratives revealed motivating forces and orientations to the baby and to caregiving, among other IWM aspects. Descriptive validity was examined for each transcription by three coders. Data for six families illustrate variation in IWM aspects among families. Motivating forces included: protecting self from overload; supporting the family in adapting to the baby's problems; knowing what baby's health outcome would be; nurturing the baby and nurturing the older children; maintaining an ideal personal life; and forming a relationship with baby. Orientations to the baby varied from a regular baby who would always have health and developmental issues; a baby who was a much loved member of the family and to whose needs everyone adapted; everything wanted in a baby except for uncertain health outcome; a baby who was needier than older children because the parent had not been able to be there for her during early hospitalization; and a baby who was happy, content, and socially engaging but vulnerable to loss. Orientations to caregiving included: deal with problems as they arise; help family maintain routines while accommodating baby's needs; get through it; bound worry so baby can be enjoyed; bring baby to fore of attention to support growth and development; and focus on breastfeeding baby and let father get medical information. Within families, IWM aspects evolved with time and change in medical condition and parents' responsibilities. IWM aspects reflected family structure and information parents had received about CCHD. Types of IWMs will be identified from the categories of motivating forces and orientations parents express. Knowledge of IWM types will aid design of family-centered interventions for anticipatory guidance and problem solving support.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParents' Internal Working Models of Caregiving Through the First Year for Infants With a Complex Congenital Heart Defecten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159984-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parents' Internal Working Models of Caregiving Through the First Year for Infants With a Complex Congenital Heart Defect</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pridham, Karen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Madison, WI, 53726-4054, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kpridham@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">T. Harrison and M.E. Bathum, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Madison; M. Krolikowski, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; J.W. Winters, Marquette University, Milwaukee; &amp; K. Mussatto, R. Fedderly, Pediatrics, Medical College of Wiscons</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Our purpose was to examine aspects of the internal working model (IWM) of caregiving described by parents of infants with a complex congenital heart defect (CCHD) during the first year. We used an informational content analysis of 52 transcriptions from 3-4 semi-structured interviews with 15 parental caregivers, most often mother with father sometimes present. Two parents were minority; age ranged from 21-36 years and education from 11-16 years. All infants had a surgically repaired or palliated CCHD. Parents' narratives revealed motivating forces and orientations to the baby and to caregiving, among other IWM aspects. Descriptive validity was examined for each transcription by three coders. Data for six families illustrate variation in IWM aspects among families. Motivating forces included: protecting self from overload; supporting the family in adapting to the baby's problems; knowing what baby's health outcome would be; nurturing the baby and nurturing the older children; maintaining an ideal personal life; and forming a relationship with baby. Orientations to the baby varied from a regular baby who would always have health and developmental issues; a baby who was a much loved member of the family and to whose needs everyone adapted; everything wanted in a baby except for uncertain health outcome; a baby who was needier than older children because the parent had not been able to be there for her during early hospitalization; and a baby who was happy, content, and socially engaging but vulnerable to loss. Orientations to caregiving included: deal with problems as they arise; help family maintain routines while accommodating baby's needs; get through it; bound worry so baby can be enjoyed; bring baby to fore of attention to support growth and development; and focus on breastfeeding baby and let father get medical information. Within families, IWM aspects evolved with time and change in medical condition and parents' responsibilities. IWM aspects reflected family structure and information parents had received about CCHD. Types of IWMs will be identified from the categories of motivating forces and orientations parents express. Knowledge of IWM types will aid design of family-centered interventions for anticipatory guidance and problem solving support.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:31:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:31:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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