Effects of Tailored and Non-tailored Print Interventions to Promote Colon Cancer Screening

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159986
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Tailored and Non-tailored Print Interventions to Promote Colon Cancer Screening
Abstract:
Effects of Tailored and Non-tailored Print Interventions to Promote Colon Cancer Screening
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Rawl, Susan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Co-Authors:V.L. Champion & L.L. Scott, School of Nursing, Indiana University, Indianapolis; C.S. Skinner, Cancer Prevention & Control, Duke University Cancer Center, Durham, NC; & H. Zhou &P.J. Loehrer, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis
First-degree relatives of people diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC) have a two- to three-fold increased risk of developing the same disease. Screening, which leads to removal of precancerous polyps, has been shown to decrease CRC incidence by 75-90%. Despite their increased risk for CRC, first-degree relatives' rates of participation in CRC screening remain low. Tailored interventions that are based on behavior change theories have demonstrated considerable promise in motivating people to engage in health-promoting behaviors. This study compared effects of two print interventions -- one tailored and one non-tailored -- designed to increase participation in CRC screening among first-degree relatives of CRC survivors. The tailored print intervention contained messages customized for each participant based on assessment of his/her demographic characteristics, CRC risk factors, health beliefs (perceived risk, benefits, barriers, self-efficacy), and stage of adoption for CRC screening. The non-tailored intervention was a generic brochure published by the American Cancer Society. Data were collected via phone interviews from 177 first-degree relatives at baseline, one week post-intervention, and three months post-baseline. Results indicated that both tailored and nontailored print interventions were equally, but only moderately, effective at increasing screening participation among FDRs within three months. The tailored intervention was slightly more effective at moving FDRs to preparation or action for colonoscopy (21.5%) compared to the non-tailored brochure (16.6%). The tailored intervention also was more effective at reducing perceived barriers to colonoscopy. At three months data collection, FDRs adherent for the screening test most appropriate for them (based on their CRC risk) had significantly higher perceived benefits and lower barriers to colonoscopy, and higher self-efficacy for colonoscopy than those who were not adherent.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Tailored and Non-tailored Print Interventions to Promote Colon Cancer Screeningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159986-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Tailored and Non-tailored Print Interventions to Promote Colon Cancer Screening</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rawl, Susan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">srawl@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">V.L. Champion &amp; L.L. Scott, School of Nursing, Indiana University, Indianapolis; C.S. Skinner, Cancer Prevention &amp; Control, Duke University Cancer Center, Durham, NC; &amp; H. Zhou &amp;P.J. Loehrer, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">First-degree relatives of people diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC) have a two- to three-fold increased risk of developing the same disease. Screening, which leads to removal of precancerous polyps, has been shown to decrease CRC incidence by 75-90%. Despite their increased risk for CRC, first-degree relatives' rates of participation in CRC screening remain low. Tailored interventions that are based on behavior change theories have demonstrated considerable promise in motivating people to engage in health-promoting behaviors. This study compared effects of two print interventions -- one tailored and one non-tailored -- designed to increase participation in CRC screening among first-degree relatives of CRC survivors. The tailored print intervention contained messages customized for each participant based on assessment of his/her demographic characteristics, CRC risk factors, health beliefs (perceived risk, benefits, barriers, self-efficacy), and stage of adoption for CRC screening. The non-tailored intervention was a generic brochure published by the American Cancer Society. Data were collected via phone interviews from 177 first-degree relatives at baseline, one week post-intervention, and three months post-baseline. Results indicated that both tailored and nontailored print interventions were equally, but only moderately, effective at increasing screening participation among FDRs within three months. The tailored intervention was slightly more effective at moving FDRs to preparation or action for colonoscopy (21.5%) compared to the non-tailored brochure (16.6%). The tailored intervention also was more effective at reducing perceived barriers to colonoscopy. At three months data collection, FDRs adherent for the screening test most appropriate for them (based on their CRC risk) had significantly higher perceived benefits and lower barriers to colonoscopy, and higher self-efficacy for colonoscopy than those who were not adherent.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:31:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:31:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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