2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159987
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Best Practices of Nurse Retention in Acute Care Hospitals
Abstract:
Best Practices of Nurse Retention in Acute Care Hospitals
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Reising, Deanna, PhD, APRN-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Contact Address:Sycamore 405, Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA
Co-Authors:C. D. Engel, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN
Objective: The purpose of this qualitative study was to gain understanding of effective nursing retention practices in "Magnet" designated hospitals. Background: The growing costs of orientation, coupled with continued demand and lack of supply of nurses in the United States, highlights the importance of retaining a qualified nursing workforce. Nurse retention efforts are a constant and significant focus of Human Resources departments, yet little is known about the effectiveness of these efforts. In 1994, the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) launched the "Magnet" Recognition Program. This program was designed to identify hospitals and health systems that demonstrated exemplary nursing services, including nurse retention practices. Methods: This study used a qualitative survey design. At the time of data collection, all 102 'Magnet-designated' facilities were invited to participate. A total of 31 facilities participated by telephone interview survey (30% return rate). Content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results: Seven major themes emerged from this study: (a) bonus, pay, benefits, scheduling, and staffing options (b) communication, councils, and recognition (c) education and clinical ladder (d) environment and support staff (e) model of retention including shared governance (f) nurse managers and units and (g) orientation/preceptorship/new employees/training. Conclusions: By applying these results, hospitals may be able to design effective retention programs for nurses. As a result, higher quality of patient care and increased nurse satisfaction may be realized.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBest Practices of Nurse Retention in Acute Care Hospitalsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159987-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Best Practices of Nurse Retention in Acute Care Hospitals</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reising, Deanna, PhD, APRN-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Sycamore 405, Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dreising@indiana.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">C. D. Engel, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this qualitative study was to gain understanding of effective nursing retention practices in &quot;Magnet&quot; designated hospitals. Background: The growing costs of orientation, coupled with continued demand and lack of supply of nurses in the United States, highlights the importance of retaining a qualified nursing workforce. Nurse retention efforts are a constant and significant focus of Human Resources departments, yet little is known about the effectiveness of these efforts. In 1994, the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) launched the &quot;Magnet&quot; Recognition Program. This program was designed to identify hospitals and health systems that demonstrated exemplary nursing services, including nurse retention practices. Methods: This study used a qualitative survey design. At the time of data collection, all 102 'Magnet-designated' facilities were invited to participate. A total of 31 facilities participated by telephone interview survey (30% return rate). Content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results: Seven major themes emerged from this study: (a) bonus, pay, benefits, scheduling, and staffing options (b) communication, councils, and recognition (c) education and clinical ladder (d) environment and support staff (e) model of retention including shared governance (f) nurse managers and units and (g) orientation/preceptorship/new employees/training. Conclusions: By applying these results, hospitals may be able to design effective retention programs for nurses. As a result, higher quality of patient care and increased nurse satisfaction may be realized.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:31:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:31:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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