2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159988
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Autonomous Management of Agitation in Dementia
Abstract:
Autonomous Management of Agitation in Dementia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Riley-Doucet, Cheryl, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Oakland University
Contact Address:Nursing, 452 O'Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA
Co-Authors:J. Mills, Nursing, Oakland University, Rochester, MI; M. Church, B. Knapp, and I. Elhajj, Engineering and Computer Science, Oakland University, Rochester, MI
The behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), such as psychosis, agitation and aggression have been reported to be the most problematic for both formal and family caregivers of older adults with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias (Rosenblatt, 2005; US Census, 2006). Research has demonstrated the efficacy of multisensory stimulation (MSS) in controlling agitation in patients with Alzheimer's disease (PWOD) and other dementias. At present, considerable nursing time is required to assess the state of the elder, choose the appropriate intervention, and finally administer sensory stimulation if indicated. The objective of this project was to develop and prototype an autonomous multisensory adaptive device (AMAD) that will monitor physiological conditions to detect symptoms of agitation in dementia patients and automatically provide multi-sensory stimuli in order to reduce agitation. The proposed system would help to reduce burden on nursing personnel and improve patient quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAutonomous Management of Agitation in Dementiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159988-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Autonomous Management of Agitation in Dementia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Riley-Doucet, Cheryl, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oakland University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, 452 O'Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rileydou@oakland.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">J. Mills, Nursing, Oakland University, Rochester, MI; M. Church, B. Knapp, and I. Elhajj, Engineering and Computer Science, Oakland University, Rochester, MI</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), such as psychosis, agitation and aggression have been reported to be the most problematic for both formal and family caregivers of older adults with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias (Rosenblatt, 2005; US Census, 2006). Research has demonstrated the efficacy of multisensory stimulation (MSS) in controlling agitation in patients with Alzheimer's disease (PWOD) and other dementias. At present, considerable nursing time is required to assess the state of the elder, choose the appropriate intervention, and finally administer sensory stimulation if indicated. The objective of this project was to develop and prototype an autonomous multisensory adaptive device (AMAD) that will monitor physiological conditions to detect symptoms of agitation in dementia patients and automatically provide multi-sensory stimuli in order to reduce agitation. The proposed system would help to reduce burden on nursing personnel and improve patient quality of life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:31:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:31:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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