Depression, Self-Esteem, Emotional Support, and Physical Symptoms of HIV-Positive, Pregnant Women in Thailand

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159989
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depression, Self-Esteem, Emotional Support, and Physical Symptoms of HIV-Positive, Pregnant Women in Thailand
Abstract:
Depression, Self-Esteem, Emotional Support, and Physical Symptoms of HIV-Positive, Pregnant Women in Thailand
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Ross, Ratchneewan
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 113 Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Co-Authors:R. Zeller, College of Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH; W. Sawatphanit, Faculty of Nursing, Burapha University, Chonburi, THAILAND; and P. Srisaeng, Faculty of Nursing, Khonkaen University, Khon Kaen, THAILAND
Problem: Women with HIV often feel stigmatized and depressed. Self-esteem, emotional support, and physical symptoms have been found to be correlated with depression. However, no study has been conducted to examine relationships among the above variables in HIV-positive pregnant women. Purpose: To examine depression rates and correlations between depression and self-esteem, emotional support, and physical symptoms among HIV-positive, pregnant Thai women. Subjects and Method: This correlational, cross-sectional study included 127 HIV-positive pregnant women at the prenatal clinic of four different hospitals in Thailand. Participants completed a questionnaire packet that had been translated into Thai with back translation method. The Center for Epidemiology Studies Depression Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support were used to measure depression (alpha = .90), self-esteem (alpha = .84), and emotional support (alpha = .89), respectively. A dichotomous question was used to assess if the participants had physical symptoms interfering with their daily activities. Simultaneous multiple regression was applied by regressing self-esteem, emotional support, and physical symptoms on depression. Results: Most women were housewives (44%). Their mean age was 26.1 years old (SD= 5.23). Ninety-two percent lived with their partner with a monthly income ranging from 1,000 to 50,000 Baht. Most claimed that they contracted HIV from their partner. Fifty-two percent were first-time mothers. Most were in their third trimester of pregnancy (63.8%). When using the cut-off score of greater than or equal to 16, 78% were depressed. When the cut-off score of greater than or equal to 23 was applied, 55.1% were significantly depressed. Self-esteem and emotional support were negatively correlated with depression (beta = -.46, p<.001; and beta = -.18, p<.01, respectively), while physical symptoms were positively correlated with depression (beta = .20, p< .05). The overall model yielded 38.6% of the explained variance (F= 25.82, p-value <.001). Conclusion: Correlates of depression were low emotional support, low self-esteem, and more physical symptoms. Nurses should include interventions to strengthen emotional support and self-esteem and to minimize physical symptoms to decrease the women's depression.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepression, Self-Esteem, Emotional Support, and Physical Symptoms of HIV-Positive, Pregnant Women in Thailanden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159989-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Depression, Self-Esteem, Emotional Support, and Physical Symptoms of HIV-Positive, Pregnant Women in Thailand</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ross, Ratchneewan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 113 Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rross1@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R. Zeller, College of Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH; W. Sawatphanit, Faculty of Nursing, Burapha University, Chonburi, THAILAND; and P. Srisaeng, Faculty of Nursing, Khonkaen University, Khon Kaen, THAILAND</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Women with HIV often feel stigmatized and depressed. Self-esteem, emotional support, and physical symptoms have been found to be correlated with depression. However, no study has been conducted to examine relationships among the above variables in HIV-positive pregnant women. Purpose: To examine depression rates and correlations between depression and self-esteem, emotional support, and physical symptoms among HIV-positive, pregnant Thai women. Subjects and Method: This correlational, cross-sectional study included 127 HIV-positive pregnant women at the prenatal clinic of four different hospitals in Thailand. Participants completed a questionnaire packet that had been translated into Thai with back translation method. The Center for Epidemiology Studies Depression Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support were used to measure depression (alpha = .90), self-esteem (alpha = .84), and emotional support (alpha = .89), respectively. A dichotomous question was used to assess if the participants had physical symptoms interfering with their daily activities. Simultaneous multiple regression was applied by regressing self-esteem, emotional support, and physical symptoms on depression. Results: Most women were housewives (44%). Their mean age was 26.1 years old (SD= 5.23). Ninety-two percent lived with their partner with a monthly income ranging from 1,000 to 50,000 Baht. Most claimed that they contracted HIV from their partner. Fifty-two percent were first-time mothers. Most were in their third trimester of pregnancy (63.8%). When using the cut-off score of greater than or equal to 16, 78% were depressed. When the cut-off score of greater than or equal to 23 was applied, 55.1% were significantly depressed. Self-esteem and emotional support were negatively correlated with depression (beta = -.46, p&lt;.001; and beta = -.18, p&lt;.01, respectively), while physical symptoms were positively correlated with depression (beta = .20, p&lt; .05). The overall model yielded 38.6% of the explained variance (F= 25.82, p-value &lt;.001). Conclusion: Correlates of depression were low emotional support, low self-esteem, and more physical symptoms. Nurses should include interventions to strengthen emotional support and self-esteem and to minimize physical symptoms to decrease the women's depression.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:31:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:31:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.