Cognitive Representations, Emotions and Misconceptions Associated With Sexually Transmitted Infections

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159990
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cognitive Representations, Emotions and Misconceptions Associated With Sexually Transmitted Infections
Abstract:
Cognitive Representations, Emotions and Misconceptions Associated With Sexually Transmitted Infections
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Royer, Heather, MS, APRN-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Madison
Contact Address:SON Clinical Science Center, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Co-Authors:S.J. Zahner, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
Adolescents and young adults have higher rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) compared to all other age groups and often have inaccurate beliefs about STIs. Because accuracy of STI beliefs is related to sexual risk taking behavior, it is important educational interventions with this age group address misconceptions and inaccurate beliefs about STIs. One theory-driven approach to understanding inaccurate beliefs that has not been tested in the STI arena is the Common Sense Model (CSM). This project used the CSM as the guiding framework to explore adolescent and young adult beliefs, misconceptions and emotions related to STIs as reported by the key providers in STI prevention, treatment and follow up. Five focus groups with a total of 30 STI care providers including public health nurses, peer educators, and nurse practitioners were conducted. The transcribed interviews were coded using a predetermined coding scheme based on the 5 dimensions of the CSM: identity, cause, timeline, consequence, cure/control in addition to emotions. The STI care providers reported a number of misconceptions in each of the 5 dimensions. Reported misconceptions included: STIs can be asymptomatic, STIs can be transmitted via oral sex, and that young people did not understand that some STIs are incurable and may last a lifetime. The findings also indicate that STIs invoke strong emotions of embarrassment and shame among this population, which may have implications for STI prevention and treatment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCognitive Representations, Emotions and Misconceptions Associated With Sexually Transmitted Infectionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159990-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cognitive Representations, Emotions and Misconceptions Associated With Sexually Transmitted Infections</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Royer, Heather, MS, APRN-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON Clinical Science Center, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hroyer@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.J. Zahner, School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Adolescents and young adults have higher rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) compared to all other age groups and often have inaccurate beliefs about STIs. Because accuracy of STI beliefs is related to sexual risk taking behavior, it is important educational interventions with this age group address misconceptions and inaccurate beliefs about STIs. One theory-driven approach to understanding inaccurate beliefs that has not been tested in the STI arena is the Common Sense Model (CSM). This project used the CSM as the guiding framework to explore adolescent and young adult beliefs, misconceptions and emotions related to STIs as reported by the key providers in STI prevention, treatment and follow up. Five focus groups with a total of 30 STI care providers including public health nurses, peer educators, and nurse practitioners were conducted. The transcribed interviews were coded using a predetermined coding scheme based on the 5 dimensions of the CSM: identity, cause, timeline, consequence, cure/control in addition to emotions. The STI care providers reported a number of misconceptions in each of the 5 dimensions. Reported misconceptions included: STIs can be asymptomatic, STIs can be transmitted via oral sex, and that young people did not understand that some STIs are incurable and may last a lifetime. The findings also indicate that STIs invoke strong emotions of embarrassment and shame among this population, which may have implications for STI prevention and treatment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:31:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:31:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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