Living With Chronic Heart Failure is Like 'Going Where no Man Has Gone Before' - At Least Where I've Never Been

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159993
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Living With Chronic Heart Failure is Like 'Going Where no Man Has Gone Before' - At Least Where I've Never Been
Abstract:
Living With Chronic Heart Failure is Like 'Going Where no Man Has Gone Before' - At Least Where I've Never Been
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Sloan, Rebecca, RNCS, Ph.D.
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University School of Nursing
Contact Address:Family Health - NU 317A, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis,, IN, 46202, USA
Co-Authors:S.J. Pressler, Adult Health, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN
Introduction: The physical, cognitive, and psychosocial changes associated with chronic heart failure (CHF) are well described. Less is known about how these changes actually effect the daily lives of CHF patients (pts). Method: From a sample of 100 CHF pts enrolled in a large study, a subset of 10 participated in unstructured, face-to-face interviews. Interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using an interpretive phenomenology approach. Atlas.ti was used to facilitate the analysis process. Results: CHF pts described how living with HF required them to change their perceptions of themselves from who they were to who they are now. One pt stated that his life had become like Star Trek, "going where no man had gone before" - at least he had never been in this place before. A young, working man with a family, he felt old, was unable to work or to support his family. Another pt owned his own business and was financially better off than his siblings; now unable to work, he had to move in with his 80 year old mother for financial support. Others pts once financially independent and in control of their lives, now had to ask the welfare system to help them. The process of applying for assistance and waiting nearly a year for financial relief was demeaning, humiliating and they had no means of controlling any aspect of the process. Others described how they had never been "unemployed," never been physically unable to take care of every day activities, and never had to manage difficult medication and dietary regimens. Others had actively managed departments or owned their own businesses; they now were unable to manage their personal checkbooks. Having no energy, struggling to breathe, or experiencing the electrical shock of implanted cardiac defibrillators kept pts aware that death could be very near. Pts found themselves "going where no man had gone before." This new land was a frightening terrain, where fear of never working again, fear of financial ruin, fear of worsening health, and fear of nursing home placement weighed heavily. Conclusion: Physical, cognitive and pyschosocial changes are most useful when taken as a constellation of factors nurses can use to identify problems and interventions for CHF patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLiving With Chronic Heart Failure is Like 'Going Where no Man Has Gone Before' - At Least Where I've Never Beenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159993-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Living With Chronic Heart Failure is Like 'Going Where no Man Has Gone Before' - At Least Where I've Never Been</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sloan, Rebecca, RNCS, Ph.D.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Family Health - NU 317A, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis,, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rsloan@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.J. Pressler, Adult Health, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis, IN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: The physical, cognitive, and psychosocial changes associated with chronic heart failure (CHF) are well described. Less is known about how these changes actually effect the daily lives of CHF patients (pts). Method: From a sample of 100 CHF pts enrolled in a large study, a subset of 10 participated in unstructured, face-to-face interviews. Interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using an interpretive phenomenology approach. Atlas.ti was used to facilitate the analysis process. Results: CHF pts described how living with HF required them to change their perceptions of themselves from who they were to who they are now. One pt stated that his life had become like Star Trek, &quot;going where no man had gone before&quot; - at least he had never been in this place before. A young, working man with a family, he felt old, was unable to work or to support his family. Another pt owned his own business and was financially better off than his siblings; now unable to work, he had to move in with his 80 year old mother for financial support. Others pts once financially independent and in control of their lives, now had to ask the welfare system to help them. The process of applying for assistance and waiting nearly a year for financial relief was demeaning, humiliating and they had no means of controlling any aspect of the process. Others described how they had never been &quot;unemployed,&quot; never been physically unable to take care of every day activities, and never had to manage difficult medication and dietary regimens. Others had actively managed departments or owned their own businesses; they now were unable to manage their personal checkbooks. Having no energy, struggling to breathe, or experiencing the electrical shock of implanted cardiac defibrillators kept pts aware that death could be very near. Pts found themselves &quot;going where no man had gone before.&quot; This new land was a frightening terrain, where fear of never working again, fear of financial ruin, fear of worsening health, and fear of nursing home placement weighed heavily. Conclusion: Physical, cognitive and pyschosocial changes are most useful when taken as a constellation of factors nurses can use to identify problems and interventions for CHF patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T22:31:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T22:31:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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